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9 Tips to Keep the Paranormal Alive in Your Life Throughout the Winter – The Big Séance Podcast #25

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Sad Bronze Angel in the Snow, Bellefontaine Cemetary, St. Louis

 

Suffering from the winter blahs? Cabin fever starting to kick in? The winter tends to be a time when many paranerds out there, struggle to find enough paranormal activity or content to keep them happy. If you’re truly one of these nerds, the autumn/Halloween season just isn’t enough to keep you going for the rest of the year. For some, the days seem longer, even though they’re shorter, and maybe you’re longing for fall once again… or at least spring. Well I’m here to get you out of that funk with 9 tips to keep the paranormal alive in your life throughout the winter.

 

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In this episode:

Tip #1: Find a good book on a paranormal, spiritual, or metaphysical topic… or even just a good ghost story!
 
Here are 4 recent books that I’ve read and can recommend to you: 
  1. “Reunions: Visionary Encounters with Departed Loved Ones” – Raymond Moody
  2. “Paranormal: My Life in Pursuit of the Afterlife” – Raymond Moody
  3. “The Spirit of Creativity: Embodying Your Soul’s Passion” – Karen A. Dahlman
  4. “Soul Sensing: How to Communicate With Your Dead Loved Ones” – Janice Carlson

I’m currently Reading “Soul-to-Soul Connections: Comforting Messages from the Spirit World”, by future guest, Carole J. Obley.

If you’re looking for a more detailed list of book recommendations and reviews, you can check out my Recommended Reading page. I’m very often adding to and updating that list.

 

Tip #2: Plan and hold a séance with a small group of friends!

 

Tip #3: Consider reading a how-to book on something like channeling, meditating, Ouija, Tarot, Astral Travel, EVP, or another equally interesting topic.

By the way, I plan on producing a kind of “how-to EVP” episode sometime soon. I know quite a few people who have talked about giving it a try, or have expressed interest in learning how to go about it. And I know these folks would be great at it and get a lot out of it. So stay tuned. And maybe you could let me know if you’re one of those people. Get in touch with me. 

 

Tip #4: Find a cozy place to stay for the weekend. It doesn’t even have to be haunted. It certainly helps if the place has some interesting history to it, or maybe it just looks haunted!

  • Probably just about every region has a few cute bed and breakfasts. 
  • How about the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado?
  • Or how about the Crescent Hotel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas?
  • Or the famous Lemp Mansion here in St. Louis?

 

Tip #5: Watch an old black and white spooky movie… or two or three. And I have a few suggestions:

 

Listener Feedback!
  • A Big THANK YOU to some wonderful listeners who have written kind reviews in iTunes!
  • Some exciting news and an update on a psychic development circle started by Marion, a medium and listener from the UK!

 

Tip #6: Start an interesting or vintage collection, perhaps one that causes you to dig into some history or genealogy.

 

Tip #7: Visit an old Cemetery with a camera (especially after a pretty snow!) 

 

Tip #8: Start a Grave Adoption project.
  • If you listened to Episode #11 from September 4, 2014, I suggested that listeners consider starting a new fall tradition of adopting graves. 

 

Tip #9: Invite a paranormal investigation team into your home or a friend’s home and convince them to let you help investigate!

 

 
The Big Seance Podcast can be found right here, on Apple PodcastsSpotifyTuneIn RadioStitcherGoogle Play Music, and iHeart Radio. Please subscribe, submit a rating, or share with a fellow paranerd! Do you have any comments or feedback? Please contact me at Patrick@BigSeance.com. Consider recording your voice feedback directly from your device on my SpeakPipe page! You can also call the show and leave feedback at (775) 583-5563 (or 7755-TELL-ME). I would love to include your voice feedback in a future show. The candles are already lit, so come on in and join the séance!

5 of the Latest Books to Land on my Doorstep

Today I bring you the latest books to land on my doorstep. Have you read any of these? Do you have other recommendations? All book descriptions are taken from their Amazon pages, which you can get to by clicking on the book covers. Be sure to check out my Recommended Reading page for some of my recommendations and book reviews. 

 

Paranormal: My Life in Pursuit of the Afterlife by Raymond Moody, M.D. 

The bestselling author of Life After Life, Raymond Moody, offers a stunning, myth-busting memoir of everything he has learned in a lifetime studying “the other side” and our connection to it. The grandfather of the NDE (near death experience) movement, Raymond Moody has, in the words of Dr. Larry Dossey, author of The Power of Premonitions, “radically changed the way modern humans think about the afterlife.” Paranormal, essential reading for fans of Dannion Brinkley and Jeffrey Long, is “a thrilling and inspiring literary experience. Anyone who is not grateful for Moody’s immense contribution to human welfare ought to check his pulse.”

 

My Son and the Afterlife: Conversations from the Other Side by Elisa Medhus 

Elisa is perhaps most known for her website, ChannelingErik.com, and two years ago I featured the site in one of my earliest blog posts here at The Big Séance. One could spend days exploring this site and the many channeled conversations with Erik Medhus.  

Dr. Elisa Medhus never believed in life after death. As an accomplished physi­cian, she placed her faith in science. All of that changed after her son Erik took his own life and then reached out from the other side.

Intimate, heartbreaking, and illuminating, go on an incredible journey from grief and skepticism to healing and belief. Based on Medhus’s wildly popular blog, Channeling Erik, My Son and the Afterlifeprovides answers to the most universal questions of being human.

At once tragic and uplifting, Erik speaks from the other side with candor, wisdom, and depth as he describes his own experiences and provides new answers about the nature of souls, death, and the afterlife—answers that have the potential to change our lives forever.

 

Behind The Walls: A Historical Exposé of The Preston School of Industry by J’aime Rubio

J’aime Rubio is an investigative journalist, true crime writer, historian, and published poet. She is also the author of two blogs: Dreaming Casually and Hollywoodland Forever. I was somehow connected to J’aime when I was in the middle of my grave adoption project this last fall. Now a friend on social media, I can tell you that she is definitely my kind of nerd!

If you are a truth seeker, “Behind The Walls” is definitely a book you will want to read. It will open your eyes to the distressing secrets held deep in history behind those ominous walls of Preston Castle. It is a fact based account of murder, mystery and mistreatment. Many might wonder what actually happened to the former inmates and employees of the Preston School of Industry. You will learn about the startling treatment they received and the outcome of their lives. If you want to learn true history about Preston, read this book.

 

Creating Your Vintage Hallowe’en: Folklore and Traditions by Marion Paull

We are now six months away from Halloween, and it is NEVER too early to prepare! I’ll probably hold off and read these last two books in late summer. I also still have one left from last fall that I can’t wait to read. Check out Trick or Treat: A History of Halloween by Lisa Morton.

Full of spooky artworks, ephemera, vintage-inspired makes, rhymes and stories, Creating your Vintage Hallowe’en celebrates the folklore and traditions surrounding this delightfully unique holiday. Read how folk used to celebrate with dressing up, fortune-telling games, parties, and much pleasurable spookiness, and recreate your own vintage Hallowe’en with old-fashioned projects, including a carved Jack o’ lantern, a witch costume, and fun decorations for your home. Creating your Vintage Hallowe’en is packed full of little-known facts about the origins of Hallowe’en customs such as bobbing for apples and carving lanterns out of pumpkins, while the charming makes and vintage artworks featuring chubby, red-cloaked witches, sleekly silhouetted black cats, cute kittens, cheery goblins and smiling spectres, will inspire you to have your own vintage-style Hallowe’en celebration.

 

Halloween Merrymaking: An Illustrated Celebration of Fun, Food, and Frolics from Halloweens Past by Diane Arkins

Recipes, games, costumes, party ideas, and decorations, along with excerpts from vintage periodicals, show the gaiety that epitomized historic Halloween celebrations.

You might also like:

Recent Books to Land on my Doorstep (from Big Séance in Nov. of 2013)

Tow More Halloween Books from Lesley Pratt Bannatyne (Big Séance)

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tales of the City, New EVP, Lizzie Borden, and 300!

I’m having one of those unmotivated, yet excited, but distracted “look there goes a chicken” weeks. I decided that this evening I wouldn’t fight it. So… here’s a plethora of bloglish for you! 

 

A.   Armistead Maupin’s The Days of Anna Madrigal hit shelves today and also arrived ON MY DOORSTEP!

Why are you bugging us about this non-paranormal book, you ask? Let me explain. It must have been about eight years ago when an ex of mine had inspired me to start reading the Tales of the City series. Reading was something I absolutely never did unless I was getting a grade for it, and I could count every book I’d read for pleasure my whole life on one hand and still have a few fingers left. I agreed to borrow the first book just to humor him. I absolutely fell in love with it, which led to me finishing the first six books from the series. I was shocked to find that I was quickly becoming obsessed with reading. For that first year I read a book a week, on average, though mostly fiction titles. Then the seventh “Tales” book, Michael Tolliver Lives, was written a year later, followed by Mary Ann in Autumn a year or two after that, and now the ninth and final volume (according to Mr. Maupin himself) is sitting right next to me! 

Obviously, I read almost all paranerdal non-fiction now, and I’ve slowed down quite a bit (due to family, investigations, sitting in this chair and blogging), but it is all due to my ex and the brilliant Tales of the City series by Armistead Maupin. My current “to be read” shelf has been put on hold for the time being. Reading about and catching up with Anna Madrigal will be a special moment.

 

2.   Cemetery recordings and two possible EVP artifacts.

For the first half of my visits for my grave adoptions this last fall, I took an audio recorder along, which is pretty typical for me. This week I finally made my way through those recordings. It seems as though no historic cemetery (at least the ones I find) managed to escape the noisiness of our new modern highways and interstates. It is sometimes hard to imagine many of them being secluded in the quiet country as they were intended. More and more I’ve realized that our society has been shoving cemeteries aside, like we’re ashamed of them or don’t know what to do with them. How do I know? People still comment in disgust or confusion as to why I spend so much time visiting or taking photos from the cemetery. Lately my answer has been… Why not?! Basically, not too many people care to even notice that they’re driving right by these cemeteries, as beautiful headstones cling to life on the edge of a retaining wall meant to separate the living from the dead.

Sorry. One of those “look there goes a chicken” moments. Back to my recordings. In much of the audio, you can’t even hear my voice over the traffic. I even captured a big rig blowing a tire while I was visiting Johnnie. I’m not sure if he jumped, but the birds in the trees next to us didn’t like it. Truthfully, I’m sure I jumped at least a few feet in the air. From all of the photos I’ve been taking, you’d never know these beautiful and historic plots of land were so noisy.

So because of all the noise, I decided that for the remainder of the visits I’d focus on what really mattered and leave the recorder in the car. It’s a wonder I was able to catch two possible EVP artifacts from my visits with Johnnie. Honestly, I probably would have written the first two-syllable muffled voice off if it hadn’t been captured again two weeks later at the same instant (as I was turning and leaving). They both sound very similar. Now the fact that they’re similar and happen at the same time on two different visits is impressive, but could also mean there’s likely to be some explanation. I haven’t decided if I’ll share them or not. I’ve learned my lesson on getting excited about an EVP and sharing it right away. Plus, I’ve been away from EVP for a while and may be out of practice. More to come. Maybe.

 

C.   Lifetime’s Lizzie Borden movie airs Saturday.

This past July, I shared news that Christina Ricci had just finished filming a Lifetime movie about the infamous (and alleged) ax murderess, Lizzie Borden! It finally airs this Saturday! Watch this preview!

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4.   My next post will be number 300!

300?!

I don’t even know what to say about this one. 300 is a big deal, right?! It is so unbelievable to me! What does one write about for his 300th post?! 

Thanks for reading! Peace!

 

 


Vintage: A Ghost Story (for the gay teen in your life)

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Do you know a young gay man or a teen in the LGBT community? Are they into ghost stories or spirit communication? Perhaps they’re just a general paranerd like most of us. If this young person fits into any of these categories, you really need to direct them to this book! 

 

From the author’s website

A lonely boy walking along a highway one autumn evening meets the boy of his dreams, a boy who happens to have died decades ago and haunts the road. Awkward crushes, both bitter and sweet, lead him to face youthful dreams and childish fears. With its cast of offbeat friends, antiques, and Ouija boards, Vintage is not your typical romance but does offer readers a memorable blend of dark humor, chills and love. 

A finalist for the Andre Norton Award and Gaylactic Spectrum Award!

 

I think his was the original cover of Vintage, which matches the one that is on my shelf.

I think this was the original cover of Vintage, which matches the one that is on my shelf.

I read this book when it was originally published in 2007. As a 29-year-old, I was just getting into reading and went through a year of doing it obsessively. I’m still obsessed with it, but back then I was reading a book a week and clearly trying to make up for lost time. Vintage: A Ghost Story, which fits into the category of young adult fiction, is the kind of book that I really wish existed when I was growing up in those awkward teen years. Growing up gay or coming out of the closet is sometimes very lonely, and it’s hard enough without having to pretend that movies, TV, and books apply to your life. When was the last time you saw a major motion picture focused on a gay love story? Exactly. Sometimes I wonder if I would have started reading years ago if this book and others like it were around just 10 or 15 years earlier. 

This book also found me in the very early stages of my developing paranormal interests and my “spiritual shift”. I remember I read it in the fall and enjoyed all its spooky elements, like the Ouija board, cemeteries, etc. Something else that stands out is that I had just started collecting old high school yearbooks from my home town of Lexington, Missouri at this time. Most of them are from the 1920s. Reading about a ghost boyfriend who died in an earlier time made going through that first yearbook very interesting.  

 

Thank you, Steve Berman!

 

Related Links: 

Book Notes on Vintage: A Ghost Story by Steve Berman (Literary Magpie)

Interview with Steve Berman (Reviews by Jessewave)

LGBTQ characters in YA fiction & LGBTQ YA Authors (Gay YA) 

 

 


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