Tag Archives: pets

Pets and the Afterlife: An Interview with Author, Rob Gutro – The Big Séance Podcast #13

big seance podcast, banner

Author, medium, and scientist, rob gutro. Pets and the Afterlife. Interview for The Big Séance Podcast.

 

Author, Medium, and Scientist, Rob Gutro, talks to us about his book, Pets and the Afterlife: How they communicate from the other side and more.

 

 

For more on Rob Gutro, visit http://ghostsandspiritsinsights.blogspot.com/.

Facebook: Rob Gutro – Author/Ghost Hunter/Medium

Twitter: @GhostMediumBook

Get this episode on iTunes!
Direct Download Link

 

.

Author, medium, and scientist, Rob Gutro. Books. The Big Séance Podcast Interview.

.

  • What is the difference between a “ghost” and a “spirit”?
  • What are the signs of afterlife communication from our pets?

Other items in this episode!

  • I share the BIG news that Jim Harold, of The Paranormal Podcast and Jim Harold’s Campfire, will be my next guest for episode #14 of The Big Séance Podcast! Don’t miss it!

 

Thanks, Rob!

 

You might also like:

Comfort From Beyond to Grieving Pet Parents (Guest blog by Rob Gutro at Big Séance.com)

 

The Big Seance Podcast can be found right here, on Apple PodcastsSpotifyTuneIn RadioStitcherGoogle Play Music, and iHeart Radio. Please subscribe, submit a rating, or share with a fellow paranerd! Do you have any comments or feedback? Please contact me at Patrick@BigSeance.com. Consider recording your voice feedback directly from your device on my SpeakPipe page! You can also call the show and leave feedback at (775) 583-5563 (or 7755-TELL-ME). I would love to include your voice feedback in a future show. The candles are already lit, so come on in and join the séance!


Comfort From Beyond to Grieving Pet Parents

If you’re like me, our pets really are our children. They teach us life lessons, they bring us joy, and they break our hearts at the same time. Please enjoy this article by Rob Gutro, and learn more about him at the end of the post. An interview with Rob for The Big Séance Podcast is in the works, so stay tuned.

 

Comfort From Beyond to Grieving Pet Parents
By Rob Gutro

The loss of a pet is like the loss of a child to pet parents. The love we share with our pets never dies, and there’s proof that our pets do communicate with us from the other side, just as people do who pass. 

Pet parents like me think about and mourn the loss of their pets often. I think about my late dogs Buzz and Sprite every day, just as people mourn the passing of their human children. Why? Because, we taught them how to go to the bathroom, bathed them, groomed them, took them to (obedience) school and was excited at their graduation, watch them interact with others, take them to the doctor when they’re sick, play with them, teach them, make friends, learn, love etc. They share with us love, anger, fear, and excitement just like human children do. Event Dr. Stanley Coren tested dogs and proved many have the intelligence of a 3-4 year old child. Dogs know when we’re disappointed in them if they tear something up – and we come home, find out and they cringe. They know when we’re sick and stay by our side, like human kids do.  The only difference to me is that our pets don’t do have careers, fall in love, move out and take care of us when we’re old.

We also have to make the decision to put our “pet child” to final rest, something human parents don’t really contend with unless in certain tragic circumstances and that is the hardest part of unconditional love. My dogs are my children. I am responsible for feeding, caring, loving them and keeping them healthy, just as humans are with human children.

Anyone that has had dogs, cats, horses and some birds know they understand words and body language.

They have the intelligence and ability to send signs to the living after they pass. Learn about the different levels of intelligence that a pet develops and how they are used to communicate signs to the living after the pet passes away.

I’m a dog owner, dog rescue volunteer, medium/paranormal investigator for Inspired Ghost Tracking of Md. and scientist. I wrote my new book “Pets and the Afterlife” to bring comfort to people (like me) who lost a pet. I’m a dog dad who lost two of my own beloved dogs and both have communicated with me, just as everyone’s pets are trying to get messages to their parents. The book provides a lot of different ways that pets can send us messages. 

As a scientist I’ve always tried to prove messages. So, I’ve included amazing new scientific studies that prove our pets have emotions and personalities. There’s also science behind why living pets can sense entities. Do you ever see your dog or cat staring at an empty corner of the room? It may very well be because your Aunt Betty’s spirit has come to visit, or there may be a ghostly cat that never crossed over from the previous owner. Because pets have the ability to sense Earth-bound ghosts or spirits (who have crossed into the light) dogs are especially good on paranormal investigations, and I took my Weimaraner on one and she helped solve a mysterious canine mystery.

Did you know that when it’s our time to go, that our dog or cat will be waiting for us? It happened to my mom and my dad when they passed. If you’re like me, you have your dog or cats ashes at home and they help keep your pet with you from time to time. One of the boxes of ashes is my late puppy Buzz, who turned out to be the world’s best canine communicator. His story, a story of our late dog Sprite’s butterfly message and stories from many others of how their pets gave messages from beyond are included.

Three of the chapters are written by well-known mediums whose own dogs returned and communicated with them to assure them they were at peace. The book features medium Barb Mallon, Ruthie Larkin the Beantown Medium and Troy Cline. A fellow dog rescue volunteer also provided an amazing story of how a ghost dog rescued her!

I wrote the book to help others find hope, peace and comfort that our pets are still around, and that the love that binds lives forever.

.

postcard-front PetsAfterlife#4REVsmall

.

The author maintains a weekly blog, Facebook and Twitter pages, where he posts about paranormal topics, and where people can share their stories or find other resources on the paranormal. The books, “Lessons Learned from Talking to the Dead,” and “Ghosts and Spirits: Insights from a Medium,” are available in paperback and E-book, on Amazon.com and other outlets at: http://tinyurl.com/mqgamq2. Published by CreateSpace, Inc.

For the author’s blog and upcoming appearances, visit:

ghostsandspiritsinsights.blogspot.com/

www.facebook.com/ghostsandspirits.insightsfromamedium

www.facebook.com/RobGutroAuthorMedium

twitter.com/GhostMediumBook


Spinner Dog

I have to give credit for this awesome photo to my sister Cassie.

I have to give credit for this awesome photo to my sister Cassie.

 

Spinner, this adorable and lovable, yet often skiddish country dog, is just one of several who have found and adopted my parents (specifically, my father) over the years. Spinner has always been known to love the nightlife, running all over the neighborhood, through the fields and the woods, and who knows where else. You’ll be outside walking one of the inside dogs in the dark, and suddenly you hear the galloping of his long legs and the flapping of his ears off in the distance, which is honestly a bit startling! You just know he’s coming for you, because it’s time to play! During the day, he takes it easy and sleeps.

Spinner has a sad and rather frustrating story that led him to my dad. My sister knows the details better, but a local *cough cough A$$ H%!#* farmer ran Spinner off because he was so disgusted that he was “gun shy”, therefore he had no use for him. Scum. But now he runs free on his adventures and returns home for shelter and food. On a good day when I’m home in Lexington for a visit, usually when Meril is with me, he’ll let me love all over him. Other days he’d rather keep his distance.

Spinner has always been a completely innocent soul, sometimes slow to trust, but that’s understandable. He reminds me of a cartoon character, just goofy and awkward (and no, not THAT Goofy, or even the other famous beagle), but completely innocent. Just like humans that sometimes share the same personalities and qualities, Spinner is sometimes taken advantage of or bullied by “mean dogs”. An incident happened several weeks ago where he was ganged up on by two notorious four-legged neighborhood bullies. Spinner was left bloody and sore, and when my father tried to care for him he ran off. Shame? Embarrassment? Would he come back? I cried hearing about it over the phone and almost drove the three hours to see him. He returned, and dad managed to put him in a pin to heal and rest for as long as he could stand it. He’s just not happy there. He has to run free. 

The wounds healed and things seemed to be back to normal, then last week I heard that Spinner was not his usual self. He was struggling to stay on his feet, making my dad wonder if these were the dreaded signs that he’s seen too many times before. He put him back in the pin to keep an eye on him, but he didn’t go far… couldn’t go far. Dad reluctantly took him to the vet.

The doctor gave him some shots and mentioned wanting to keep Spinner over the weekend to keep an eye on him, just in case he bounced back from whatever this was. If not, it was understood that Monday could be a day where Spinner would be assisted across the Rainbow bridge. Updates over the weekend didn’t sound promising. He seemed to be completely paralyzed other than his head. I was happy that my sister was able to visit him to give him company from a familiar face. She said his eyes lit up when they entered the room. How miserable of a weekend it must have been for him. 

I shared Spinner’s photo on my Facebook feed and asked that people keep him in their thoughts and prayers, and though he doesn’t know many people on Facebook, he suddenly had several fans sending him love. But in my heart I didn’t feel great about his recovery. When Monday morning arrived, I sent tons of energy and prayed, and tried to pass on a message that went a little like this: “Hey Spinner Dog! I love you and hope you’re not in pain. If you’re going to get up, and if you’re able to, NOW IS THE TIME! Get up! And if you’re not able to, just rest and it’ll be okay.

My sister left a voice mail while I was at school yesterday, and it left me in tears! Spinner was doing better and was due to go back home… and he did. I couldn’t believe it! 

When I called dad to get the story, I was blown away. Spinner apparently had some kind of “Coonhound Paralysis” that tends to be temporary. Dad intended on keeping him inside while he got better and gained strength. He took him outside with a leash (rrriiiiight) to get him some exercise, and Spinner broke away and ran around the house at lightning speed, around the lake, and out of sight! Dad, who was obviously shocked, was able to catch up with him later and put him back into the pin again. It was funny to hear dad cursing and calling him a “faker” over the phone… Ha! Spinner Dog just has to be free and do things his own way. 

Proof of the power of positive thought and prayer? I’m not sure… but I feel bad that I didn’t have more faith that he’d pull through.  

 

 


All Pets Go to Heaven…

Since it has been a while, I wanted to write a blog post a day or two ago, but with the excitement of all of our tornado weather in the last few days, I (and our four-legged son Meril, unfortunately) have been rather distracted. But today I am inspired to bring up a topic that is so very close to my heart, and that is the subject of pets and the afterlife. At the risk of getting the Syvlia Browne haters riled up again, I’ve had her book All Pets Go to Heaven on my shelf waiting to be read for several years now. It’s not a book I’ve been excited to read because sometimes I just don’t even want to think about the topic, but just like our family and loved ones of the human variety, death can never be avoided. It’s a reality that we all must go through. As my “to be read” shelf has gotten down to just a few books (that have also been there for a while), I decided to get this one started a few days ago. 

I won’t lead you to believe that this is the greatest book in the world that you have to drop into your Amazon shopping cart right this moment. To be honest, if it weren’t for Borders going out of business a few years back, I probably would never have had it. The first third of the book is actually pretty dry and discusses the history of animals as pets, animal totems, etc. Once you get past all that, Sylvia includes several heartfelt stories from readers about their pets, pets coming back from the other side to visit, and in a few cases even having a hand in choosing their owner’s next pet after they cross over. These stories got me thinking back to all of my pets growing up, and of course the love we have for our very spoiled son Meril, who gives us so much happiness today. 

Me with a young Mickey Mouse.

Me with a young Mickey Mouse.

My very first dog that I have memory of was named “Mickey Mouse”, even though she was a girl dog. She was very much a mutt and as a puppy was rescued by my father near the banks of the Missouri River in my hometown of Lexington, Missouri. Though the memory is foggy, I remember her energy and running around the house, tail wagging like crazy. If I calculate correctly, Mickey Mouse was 19 when she died. I was actually a freshman or sophomore in college and away from home at the time. When I got the call my heart broke. I didn’t really have any memories of life without her. How was I going to live without her? Often growing up I would literally talk to her out loud, telling her my silly problems with tears in my eyes (and she always seemed to understand and was there to listen). She was mostly an outside dog, and to this day I’ve never seen a dog with such street smarts. I swear to you she looked both ways before crossing the street to get to the field across from our house. I can still hear her squeaky bark and remember how she would stand guard for hours, trapping a squirrel in a tree. After mom called me upset and gave me the news I remember lying on my bed in my apartment an hour away from home and crying all day. At one point something caught my eye toward the entrance of my apartment. I swear I saw Mickey Mouse walk into the room from the front door, but things were blurry and in a flash she was gone. I, of course, talked myself into believing I imagined it because of being upset. But did I? 

A much older Mickey Mouse. (Not the greatest picture.)

A much older Mickey Mouse. (Not the greatest picture.)

Growing up we had several other dogs who have since passed. Even before Mickey Mouse died we lost a beautiful dog named “Missie” who was hit by a car. We hadn’t had her very long. After my father buried her in the back yard, it was actually my Aunt Mae or my Grandma Keller (don’t remember) who saw me sitting by the grave by myself and walked down to console me, explaining that maybe Missie would be reincarnated and I would see her again. I don’t remember my reaction or response to the thought, but that was the first time I had heard of such a thing. I do, however, remember believing with all of my heart that I’d see all of my dogs greet me when I got to the other side. Mickey Mouse was our first dog. She was so special… and she was the one who lived the longest. Gosh… I get choked up now even thinking about it. 

I’m only halfway through the book now, but I felt inspired to share this with you today. It is only fitting that right before I began writing this post I found the following story being shared on Facebook, a story about a hero dog named Kaiser, who crossed that beautiful rainbow bridge just yesterday. 

Members of the Plymouth, Mass. police department salute their K-9 companion as he’s walked into the vet’s office to be put down. (Picture via Old Colony Memorial and Plymouth Police Working Dog Foundation. Caption via WLS-TV Facebook page.)

  Members of the Plymouth, Mass. police department salute their K-9 companion as he’s walked into the vet’s office to be put down. (Picture via Old Colony Memorial and Plymouth Police Working Dog Foundation. Caption via WLS-TV Chicago, IL Facebook page.)

May 31, 2013 (PLYMOUTH, Mass.) (WLS) — Police officers in Plymouth, Mass. saluted “Kaiser” the police dog as he was led to the vet’s office to be put down on Friday.

 The 2.5-year-old German Shepherd was diagnosed with a chronic and fatal kidney disease this March, according to Plymouth Police patrolman Jamie Lebretton, who handled the dog.

“Kaiser loved being a Police Dog and I will miss him dearly. Out of love and respect for Kaiser, and with the input from our excellent vet, trainer, and family, I have made the heart wrenching decision to end Kaiser’s suffering,” Lebretton posted on the K-9 unit’s Facebook page.

An image showing the Plymouth Police officers saluting the dog quickly went viral on Friday after it was posted on Facebook by the Old Colony Memorial and Reddit.

WLS-TV CHICAGO, IL

Rest In Peace, Kaiser. The respect shown for this furry hero makes me tear up. So sweet. 

Meril in the center with his cousin Mahni (left) and aunt Emily (right).

Meril in the center with his cousin Mahni (left) and aunt Emily (right).

 

Anyone have a story to share? Have you had similar experiences?

 

Peace!

 

Related Meril Posts:

Dreaming of Flying… and Dogs?

Happy Holidays 2012!

From Pumpkins to Jack-O-Lanterns 2012

2012 Family of Pumpkins

It’s October

 

 


%d bloggers like this: