Tag Archives: old cemeteries

Return to the Old Catholic Cemetery in Lexington, Missouri

 

It hasn’t changed a bit, this old cemetery. Until two years ago when I visited it last, it had been over 20 years since I’d seen it. I remembered several of the individual headstones like I had just been there the day before. It’s weird, the things our brains choose to remember and hold on to. Growing up, I spent quite a bit of time here as my grandparents lived nearby. In fact, one of my earliest childhood memories is of an uncle of mine giving me a ride through this cemetery on a four-wheeler, and coming back with a collection of pine cones. I’m sure it wasn’t very deep back then, but I remember strolling through this grass and over the hill… and pondering life… and probably death. I don’t remember my reasons for enjoying my time there so much, but I do recall having general conversations with any spirit wanting to listen. I also recall my Bama (grandma) packing a lunch for me on a few occasions. One thing is for sure. When I think about a cemetery, or when I’m reading of a fictional graveyard, it is always this beautiful place that ends up being the setting in my mind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other recent cemetery photography posts:

The Iron Fence and the Family Plot

Cemetery of Immaculate Conception of Dardenne, Missouri

Francis Howell Cemetery, St. Charles, Missouri

Perfectly Lonely and Snowy City of Souls – Return to Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis

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Francis Howell Cemetery, St. Charles, Missouri

 

More Recent Cemetery Posts: 

Perfectly Lonely and Snowy City of Souls - Return to Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis (Big Séance)

Perfectly Lonely and Snowy City of Souls – Return to Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis (Big Séance)

Lessons in Photography & Other Nerdly Stuff (Big Séance)

Lessons in Photography & Other Nerdly Stuff (Big Séance)

Another Visit to Gumbo (Big Séance)

Another Visit to Gumbo (Big Séance)

A New Lens and a New Cemetery (Big Séance)

A New Lens and a New Cemetery (Big Séance)

 

 


Perfectly Lonely and Snowy City of Souls – Return to Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis

Hilts Bronze Angel

All winter long I’ve been anxiously awaiting the perfect day to return to Bellefontaine Cemetery under snow cover. I’d been once before, though things were much greener then, and I didn’t have my new camera, or the photography skills that I’ve gained this year.   

Hilts Bronze Angel

Opening in 1849, Bellefontaine (pronounced “bell fountain” by most St. Louisans) was designed by Almerin Hotchkiss (Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York) and consists of 314 acres of park-like beauty with mausoleums as far as the eye can see. It truly is a small city. Among other big names from the region, you’ll find the resting places of Adolphus Busch (beer giant), William ClarkSara Teasdale, and the infamous Lemp family.

 

Since it was 28 degrees and I knew once I made it there I’d be on foot for a few hours, I bundled in layers and prepared as if I was on a journey to climb Mount Everest. The always-kind and wonderful workers in the office mentioned that the roads were drivable, but they didn’t seem too confident in that statement, so I decided to walk. They encouraged me to take a map and keep the office number on hand. I guess that’s what they do when they see out-of-shape fat guys drop by for photos in the winter. I figured I’d stay close to the main entrance and photograph what I could until it got cold or I felt I was going too far into the cemetery. I didn’t know until later that I’d walked a pretty massive circle that covered most of the popular and historical monuments on the driving tour.

 

 

As I bravely started out, I couldn’t help but notice that my car was the only guest car in the lot. It appeared I was going to be very alone on this journey. Awesome! It was also very quiet, other than the crows flying around, keeping their distance, and warning others of my presence. It was creepy and cool at the same time.

 

With every hill I kept finding beautiful excuses to keep going further. I was impressed that I found a few sites by memory, such as the famous “Girl in the Glass Box”. Even as I detoured off the road and trudged through snow as I found interesting shots, I felt confident I knew where I was and what direction I’d need to head once I decided to go back. I never pulled out the map, or my iPhone, for that matter. 

The famous Luyties “Girl in the Glass Box”

I’m not entirely sure I can describe to you how pleasant and enjoyable this was for me. I mean, I obviously enjoy spending time in cemeteries a little more than the average person, but to be alone (truly alone, I never saw another guest) in the middle of such a beautifully massive city of buried souls, in the middle of winter, enjoying the peace and quiet, with the added risk of getting lost or frozen before dark, was truly an amazing experience. I suppose this risk of being found frozen Jack-Nicholson-in-“The Shining” style could be why one of the workers came by in a cemetery truck as I was on the opposite end of the cemetery an hour and a half later… just checking. I waved and smiled and continued on.

Tate Mausoleum

 

Close up of the Tate Mausoleum doors

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The Francis Grieving Woman

I have to be honest, two hours later, as it got a bit darker, there was a moment when I wasn’t sure exactly where I was or if I was going in the right direction. I wasn’t lost for long, but I made the conscious decision to stop photographing so that I could focus on looking for the main entrance. It’s at this point that I nervously picked up the pace and started to feel the burn in my hips and joints. I couldn’t wait to find the car. A few minutes later I found it off in the distance, but I couldn’t believe how far away I was on the complete opposite side of where I’d been. I truly had made a pretty big circle. When I got to my car, the same cemetery worker was standing guard at the gate, probably relieved that he wouldn’t have to go searching for me again in the dark. I’d made it back forty-five minutes before the gates close and had been walking just over two hours.

 

The massive and very popular Adolphus Busch (of Anheuser-Busch Brewery) Mausoleum

 

Through the gate of the Adolphus Busch (of Anheuser-Busch Brewery) Mausoleum

 

Close up shot of the gate of the Adolphus Busch (of Anheuser-Busch Brewery) Mausoleum

 

These decorative symbols are a part of the bottom of the gate of the Adolphus Busch (of Anheuser-Busch Brewery) Mausoleum

 

 

I sat for a while and relaxed in my car as if I’d truly conquered my own Everest. I had hundreds of photos that I was so very excited about! I couldn’t wait to get home and check them out. I took a deep breath, texted Joe to let him know I was alive, and then I drove the hour-long trip home with a wind-burned face. 

 




 

Again, the Hilts Bronze Angel

 

Before I leave, I wanted to make you aware of my Flickr page, where all of my newest and favorite photography, including this set, is being stored. Please feel free to drop by, comment, or share any of the photos.

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Thanks for your support!

Patrick

 

 

 


A New Lens and a New Cemetery


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Emmanuel United Church of Christ Cemetery
Weldon Spring, Missouri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emmanuel United Church of Christ, Weldon Spring, Missouri

 

Some of my first shots with the new lens

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You might also like: 

365 and 2014 and New Chapters (KarlPfeiffer.com)

#HauntedPhotoAWeek (Renae Rude – The Paranormalist)

A Very Wintry Update (Big Séance)

Learning Curve and the First Shots with my New Camera (Big Séance)

 

 

 


Assumption Cemetery, O’Fallon Missouri…

Visit the Assumption Parish Website

 

Related:

Cravens Cemetery, Camden, Missouri (Big Séance)

Cemeteries: Concordia and Emma, Missouri (Big Séance)

Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri (Big Séance)

Forest Grove Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri (Big Séance)

Lexington’s Old Catholic Cemetery (Big Séance)

Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri (Big Séance)

Two Smoky Mountain Cemeteries (Big Séance)

Just a Stroll through a Random Cemetery on the Way Home (Big Séance)

Ghost Hunting in Haunted Cemeteries (Jim Harold’s Ghost Insight)

 


Cemeteries: Concordia and Emma, Missouri…

On my way home from Lexington this weekend I decided to visit and photograph some small cemeteries that I always see from the highway. These three cemeteries (Holy Cross Lutheran, Saint Paul’s Lutheran, and Saint John Cemetery) are actually very close to each other. Other than the sound of the traffic on the highway, they seem so very peaceful and sleepy with country surrounding them. They have so much character!

I also decided to experiment for the first time with photo manipulation. I used an app on my iPhone called Camera+ if you’re interested. I know some people aren’t into it but I had fun experimenting with it. I’m not sure if this will be a new thing or not. We’ll see. What do you think? 

 

Holy Cross Lutheran Cemetery, Emma, Missouri

 

Saint Paul’s Lutheran Cemetery, Concordia, Missouri

 

Saint John Cemetery, outside of Concordia, Missouri

 

Related Posts:

Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, MO 

Forest Grove Cemetery, Lexington, MO

Old Catholic Cemetery, Lexington, MO

Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, MO

Two Smoky Mountain Cemeteries, Tennessee

Just a Stroll through a Random Cemetery, Wentzville, MO

 

 

 


Forest Grove Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri…

I really enjoyed my time in this next cemetery. I would have stayed all day if it weren’t 100 degrees. My Great Grandmother lived near this one. It is across from what used to be the golf course on Golf Road in Lexington. I have to confess that growing up I heard spooky stories about this one. I remember as a teen being dared to just drive by the place in the dark… and considering this one really IS in the middle of nowhere, it truly would have been a bit spooky. Fortunately, it’s not so eerie in the daylight. The few times I actually visited this cemetery it seemed so forgotten. A few years ago I stopped by with my family and I was saddened to see signs of bonfires with beer cans and other garbage right next to headstones. 

I have to tell you that on this visit the place was looking great! It got me thinking of the people who give their time to take care of these older cemeteries. I’d love to find out who takes care of this one because they’ve done a good job. I felt nothing but beautiful energy here, and I could have easily posted 15 more interesting and beautiful photos, but that’s just too many for a blog. Also, I have to note that there were many graves of veterans from several wars in this cemetery. I thanked each one that I saw. I was also surprised to see so many current graves toward the back of the cemetery, and this made me smile. This beautiful place hasn’t been forgotten after all. 

I hope you enjoyed the photos from my cemetery tour. This is the last post from the three-part series. If you missed them, visit my Machpelah Cemetery and Old Catholic Cemetery posts. And for any of my other cemetery posts, scroll down and click on the “cemeteries” category to the right.

Peace!

Forest Grove Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri – Founded in 1890

I fell down the hill across the road after taking this photo. Can’t wait to hear it on the audio.

Anyone know what these are?

I just really loved this one for some reason.


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