Tag Archives: historic lexington

Images of America: Lexington, Missouri

I realize that probably a very small amount of my readers are from my hometown of Lexington, Missouri, but I would still like to reflect on an amazing new book by the late Roger E. Slusher and the Lexington Historical Association. Images of America: Lexington kept me from going to bed at a decent hour two nights in a row… and it started the second I picked it up off my doorstep. I stared at the pictures. I compared the pictures. I pulled up current locations on Google Maps. And I did a lot of imagining.

Growing up in Lexington, as a child you quickly learn about the Civil War battle that took place there. For me, I was always specifically interested in the history of the buildings, what was where, what used to be, etc. I wonder what my now small and quiet hometown was like when it was the third largest city in the state, hustling and bustling with four colleges at one point, theaters and opera houses, an entire block full of saloons, headquarters for the Pony Express, factories, coal mines… the list goes on. I’ve seen a lot of the local photo collections that people have put together over the years, but I hadn’t seen so many of the photos in this book. Many of the photos are aerial or taken from the City Hall dome, and they are breathtaking. (I only wish they would have chosen one of the beautiful street photos for the cover.) When you think of the historic Main Street and Franklin, you think about the old buildings that still exist being the original structures. Then I find out that many of these beautiful and historical buildings were not the first to be on those lots. And there were blocks and blocks of buildings, neighborhoods, farms, and homes that just aren’t there anymore. If I went back in a time machine to the mid to late 1800s, I’m quite sure I would not be able to find my way around.

Lexingtonians know that there is something special about their town, but this book helps you to realize just how important those remaining gems of buildings and locations are. Lexington has unfortunately lost a few of these gems this year. I suppose these things are just bound to happen with the passing of time, but I wonder if residents felt the same loss when they lost buildings a hundred or more years ago? It also kind of makes you wonder if 100 years from now people will be fighting to save the historic Pizza Hut, the last remaining Sonic Drive-In in the nation, or the beautiful and historic Woodland Creek district. Or like many cities in the early 1900s, will we not recognize the future value of our neighborhoods and just bulldoze them down to build new?  

Fascinating book! If you’re in town, you can pick one up at The River Reader today!

Want to visit or learn more about Lexington?

 

The Battle of Lexington & The Anderson House

 

 

The Cannonball and the Courthouse

 

 

 

 

Wentworth Military Academy

 

 

 

 

Linwood Lawn

 

 

 

Antiques & Shopping

 

 

 

 

Related Posts:

Final Paranormal Investigation Report of Papa Jack’s Pizza

Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri 

Forest Grove Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri

Old Catholic Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri

 


Do Spirits Reside at Papa Jack’s Pizza in Lexington, Missouri?

A few nights ago, Missouri Spirit Seekers (MOSS) investigated a popular pizza place in Lexington, Missouri. This last fall I had stopped in for lunch at Papa Jack’s Pizza with some family after a morning of shopping on Main Street. (By the way, I highly recommend the pepperoni pizza with a special request of BBQ sauce instead of pizza sauce. Sounds weird, I know… but delicious!) This visit led us to discussing the history of the building and the paranormal. We learned that employees at Papa Jack’s Pizza have been experiencing friendly paranormal activity on a regular basis from the time they  moved into the building on 1014 Main Street. With an amazing view of the Lafayette County Courthouse (built just 20 years earlier) just across the street, the Papa Jack’s building is believed to have been built in 1869, which would have been eight years after the Civil War Battle of Lexington, and making it one of the oldest structures on Main Street.   

Most of the activity has been reported on the restaurant level as well as the basement. Voices, singing, whistling, footsteps, apparitions, and being touched are just some of the experiences that are reported in these two areas. However, there are two upper floors of forgotten apartment units that haven’t seen tenants since the early 1980s. In a picture below, you can see that much of the furniture and appliances in these apartments are still there, creating the eerie feeling of being in a 1970s time warp. A very musty and dusty time warp, yes, but strangely beautiful and absolutely fascinating. In another picture, you can still see a calendar on the wall that tries its best to get us to believe that it is May of 1982. As a native of Lexington, it was hard to imagine that what I was seeing had been sitting there, mostly untouched, for nearly my entire life and childhood. And as someone obsessed with studying and learning about the paranormal, it was like finding an abandoned theme park in your own town. It made me stop to realize that there are probably many forgotten gems just like this one, hidden away above the shops and stores on Main Street. 

Our goal in investigating was to find out more about the unseen tenants. One of these spirits is said to be that of a friendly little girl, so we came to play. We have tons of footage and hours of audio to review, which will likely take a month or more. But here is something that I can tell you right now before I even get started. This was one of our most exciting investigations yet! And it turns out we did have some interesting experiences on the restaurant level and in the basement that we will be looking into. And yes, the paranerd in me hopes to find evidence of spirit communication from the two upper floors of the building. 

View of the Lafayette County Courthouse from a top floor window.

View of the Lafayette County Courthouse from a top floor window.

I will likely post an occasional update right here at www.BigSeance.com, and when analysis is complete, a final report with evidence will be published at www.MoSpiritSeekers.com.

 

 

 


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