Tag Archives: handbook

Chip Coffey’s “Growing Up Psychic”

Back in October, I was encouraged by a work friend to accompany her and her husband to see Chip Coffey in St. Louis. It was truly awesome, and I blogged about that experience in my 10 important reasons to go see Chip Coffey at a “Coffey Talk” near you. I immediately ordered his book, and just as I expected, it was very enjoyable. But it was also very informative. I know, I know. How boring, right? Keep reading…

When I bought the book, I apparently didn’t read the description on the back. I assumed that like most books by psychics, it would be about his psychic experiences growing up, as the title suggests. What I didn’t quite realize, is that even though he shares his story, it is really meant to be a guide or handbook for those people who may work with or have children with psychic abilities. As the star and psychic from A&E’s hit show Psychic Kids: Children of the Paranormal, there is perhaps no one better fit to write this book for us.

As an educator, I’ve always tried to be sensitive and aware of the many different kinds of children I work with. They come from different cultures, backgrounds, family structures, socioeconomic status, etc. But they also come to me with different gifts and exceptionalities. As someone who has grown up with a disability and some exceptionalness myself, I’d like to think my students know that they can trust me to be there for support. But with so many students, and with so many crazy days where I don’t get to stop and breathe or have more than a few moments to myself until the buses leave the parking lot (and sometimes not even then), I wonder how many students I’ve had with exceptional psychic abilities. How many of those students may have been struggling? Am I open to seeing the signs? Have these students viewed me as someone who is accepting and sensitive to those abilities or gifts? 

Like clockwork, just a few days ago a student mentioned to me that she was going to have to spend some time alone in her house after school, and that she wasn’t a fan of having to do this. When I asked her why, she said her house was haunted. She said she’d seen apparitions and scary things, “like Jack the Ripper stuff”, according to her. As I walked with her out of the classroom while she talked, I consciously made an attempt to listen to clues and be supportive. In fact, as it seemed that she was working hard to convince me that her story was true, the last thing I said to her as she went off to her next class was “I believe you.” I’m not sure I would have been on my toes or “with it” enough if it hadn’t been for just finishing this book. 

Do you have children? Do you work with them? This will be worth checking out. 

 

From the back of the book and Amazon.com

NO one knows more about psychic kids than Chip Coffey, and no expert on psychic kids is better known throughout the world. These kids are widely misunderstood, misjudged, and misdiagnosed. InGrowing Up Psychic, Chip Coffey offers indispensable information for anyone who interacts with these extraordinary youngsters—parents, educators, medical professionals, mental health clinicians, members of the clergy, paranormal investigators—and adults who faced the challenges of growing up psychic.

In Growing Up Psychic, drawing on his firsthand experience and the true stories of kids he has worked with and helped, Chip Coffey shows you how to:

• Determine if a child is really psychic—as opposed to simply imaginative or
seeking attention
• Identify the different kinds of psychic abilities kids (and adults) might have
• Gain control over when and how psychic information is received
• Safely connect with others in the psychic community
• Deal with skeptics and disbelievers

 

Me with Chip Coffey

Me with Chip Coffey

For more information on Chip, visit www.chipcoffey.com.

 

You might also like: 

10 important reasons to go see Chip Coffey at a “Coffey Talk” near you (Big Séance)

Béla Bartók, Wet Goblins, and the Post Halloween Blues (Big Séance)

Vintage: A Ghost Story (for the gay teen in your life) (Big Séance)

Angel Moments: Music as Meditation… Or is it? (Big Séance)

Children who have spirit friends (Big Séance)

House of Darkness House of Light, Volume Two, by Andrea Perron, and more on The Conjuring (Big Séance)

 


The Scole Group’s “A Basic Guide”…

I’ve blogged about the Scole group several times here at The Big Séance. Like many people, I first read a bit about this group as it is simply highlighted in many books on the topic of spirit communication. Then, when I saw the documentary, The Afterlife Investigations, it seemed so much more real. I then had to read the book The Scole Experiment: Scientific Evidence for Life After Death by Grant and Jane Solomon. From reading the book

The “Scole Hole”, where most of the experiments took place.

I learned that in 1996 the Scole group formed “The New Spiritual Science Foundation”, and they published A Basic Guide to the development of Physical Psychic Phenomena using energy. This guide was written to help groups all over the world wanting to start similar spiritual energy circles, and sometimes it is just referred to as “A Basic Guide”. Of course, I had to have it. To my knowledge it can now only be obtained by downloading it from the link above. 

If you’re not familiar with this group and the really cool phenomena that they documented, below is from one of my previous posts. 

The Scole Experimental Group was started by two mediums who joined several other spiritual individuals in what most probably know as a spirit circle, which is also similar to a séance group. One thing I didn’t know before reading this book was that the structure of the group and the experiments were pretty much organized and guided by their “spirit team”. The team was composed of around 6 main entities, but other spirit scientists and technicians were involved in the process. Most of their communications came by using the two mediums in trance, but this was not the case every time. Some of the phenomena were moving spirit lights, manifestations of hands and faces, being touched, surround sound-like voices speaking in the room, levitating objects, faces and pictures showing up on sealed photographic film, and some of the cooler experiences involved many gifts of apports (the manifestation of an object seemingly coming from nowhere).

What was the goal of this group? In his first visit, Manu, the “gatekeeper” and leader of the spirit team told the Scole Group that “The team of beings I represent is made up of many thousands of minds from the many other realms of existence. We will be working with your group to provide very tangible evidence of the reality of these other realms. Our plan is to pioneer important methods of communication between the dimensions using ‘energy’ rather than the more traditional methods such as ectoplasm.”

It might be easy to blow this group off and say that there is no way to prove any of this phenomena and the experiences were real, but there are a number of scientists, psychologists, parapsychologists, and other wise and educated professionals who were present and inspected and studied the experiments. Some of these individuals were connected with the highly critical Society for Psychical Research.

I have some séance plans for this fall, but spirit circles are quite a bit different. If you’re interested in forming or joining one, then you should definitely check out the guide, especially if you’re wanting amazing results like the Scole group. 

What are some of the highlights?

Well, the handbook gives guidance on how to choose members for your group and stresses the old saying that “like attracts like”. It might take several sittings to find the right balance and harmony of group members. Once a group is established, no member outranks another, however, group members should consider themselves members on a trial basis at first. On a side note, I’ve heard from people who have had experience in spirit circles. Some  people end up getting their feelings hurt when they end up not fitting into a group’s harmony. I’ve heard of power struggles that go on in some groups as well. It seems to me like finding that harmony would be a tough trial period to get through. 

The Scole group received many specific and necessary instructions from their spirit team, and the room and its layout was apparently a part of those instructions. Your room ideally should be used for nothing else but your spirit circles (tough one). It should be free of unnecessary furniture and decorative items, other than a table and chairs arranged in a circle around it, and other recommended items (including a required glass dome) used for experiments. Unnecessary electronic equipment or powered items should be removed. And, perhaps most importantly, these sittings are to be carried out in complete darkness. This could make finding a location a challenge. The Scole group admits that this requirement is sometimes controversial, but the spirit team insists that it is necessary for phenomena to occur in any spirit circle. Perhaps for obvious reasons, a location with only one way in or out is ideal. Something I thought was cool was that luminous tabs (for the table, other experimental items, and wrist bands for sitters) is recommended. 

The handbook also gives instructions on general procedures, such as how often you should meet, when to arrive, how long a session should be expected to last, settling in and relaxing, opening prayer, quite a bit of instructions about music that should be used (as a music teacher this was very interesting), a healing exercise that should always happen after the main session, and lastly, a closing prayer. 

 

Forming or joining a spirit circle just may be in my future. I find it very interesting. 

Peace!


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