Tag Archives: film

Ouija: A New Movie Coming In October!

 

There’s a new movie about the famous talking board that is due to be released in October! If you’re like me, you’re surprised that you didn’t even know this was a thing. And unless you had a date at a movie theater this last weekend, it’s likely you haven’t seen the trailer, since it hasn’t been released online.

Appropriately named, Ouija was directed by Stiles White and stars Olivia Cooke (who is fantastic in Bates Motel), Ana Coto, Daren Kagasoff (The Secret Life of the American Teenager), Bianca A. Santos, Douglas Smith (Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters), Matthew Settle (Gossip Girl), Vivis Colombettie (Paranormal Activity 2, Patch Adams), and Robyn Lively (The Karate Kid, Part III, Teen Witch), according to IMDb.

 

From our 2nd Annual Thanksgiving Ouija Session.

From our 2nd Annual Thanksgiving Ouija Session.

 

Hasbro, the owner and manufacturer of the board, has been working since 2008 to get this movie produced, according to Wikipedia. Remember that if you see the film. The Wikipedia page also describes it as a “low-budget film” and mentions that it only started production seven months ago. Currently, the film’s website seems to be… well, a little under construction, and you won’t find much more on their certified Facebook page, either, other than the lovely banner I’ve included above. That, of course, could change by the time you see this.  

I happened to catch the trailer before watching the painfully sad The Fault In Our Stars on Saturday. It did look spooky and exciting. But where’s the trailer online? According to ShockTillYouDrop.com, this is “an unusual move these days”. In this trending social media age, it seems very bizarre to me that they haven’t already made it available for tweens (and nerds like me) all over the country to “like” and “share”. Clearly, the trailer exists. When it is released, I’ll do my best to embed it right below this paragraph. 

UPDATE! The trailer is here and embedded below! Also, check out my most recent post on the film HERE

 
I’m not going to lie, I’m very excited about this movie (duh!), but I have mixed feelings. Most likely, this will once again make “experts” out of people who will say it’s an evil tool. And how will they know? Because they saw this movie, or because they used a Ouija board “one night at a party when I was a kid.” As I’ve mentioned several times recently, over the past two years I’ve experimented off and on with the Ouija board under several different conditions, and it’s so very exciting to stare at a piece of cardboard and a chunk of plastic that does nothing.

Does anyone have any thoughts? Will I see you at the theater?  

 

You might also like: 

The Spirits of Ouija: Four Decades of Communication (Big Séance)

The Spirits of Ouija: Four Decades of Communication (Big Séance)

Fear and Spirit Communication (Big Séance)

Fear and Spirit Communication (Big Séance)

Thanksgiving Ouija Session 2013 (Big Séance)

Thanksgiving Ouija Session 2013 (Big Séance)

 


No One Dies in Lily Dale

I don’t remember who recommended it or brought it to my attention. It may have been one of you. So I purchased No One Dies in Lily Dale, the 2010 HBO Documentary, from Amazon and it arrived on the doorstep this evening. I didn’t waste much time before settling down with some coffee and a blanket, and throwing the DVD in the computer.

I’ve wanted to visit Lily Dale since I learned about it for the first time a few years back. I know several of you have been… I enjoy seeing the pictures. I can think of three major reasons I want to go: to surround yourself by open and enlightened people, many who are psychics and/or mediums who have the ability to give readings or deliver messages from loved ones; to see the physical beauty of the homes, the nature, and the surroundings of the peaceful community; and lastly, to be in a place with so much history and so many artifacts from the early days of the spiritualist movement.

This documentary captures everything that I was curious about, like just what is a reading like there? Are there community members that just live there all year? Is everyone nice and friendly? Is there a gate? (Seriously, that has been one of my questions.) You’ll also see skeptics or open skeptics roaming around. But for sure, it seems that in the documentary,  many of the visitors had recently lost loved ones. 

Check this documentary out. I think my Lily Dale book might just be next. 

For more on Lily Dale and its history, visit www.lilydaleassembly.com

See the trailer below. 

 

 


The Uninvited (1944) will finally be released on DVD

A year ago I very much wanted to watch the classic 1944 haunted house film, The Uninvited, based on a 1941 novel by Dorothy MacardleI even included it on my list of Movies I Plan On Checking Out This Fall from last year, and I was interested in reviewing it here at The Big Séance. I couldn’t find it anywhere. Not even a bootleg version on YouTube. Well I decided to search for it again tonight and was excited to see that thanks to The Criterion Collection, The Uninvited is finally being released to DVD in late October! The film has a new and improved cover that you can see here (a major improvement). According to Criterion, the features also include a new visual essay by filmmaker Michael Almereyda, two radio adaptations from 1944 and 1949 (both starring Ray Milland), the trailer, and a booklet featuring an essay by critic Farran Smith Nehme and a 1997 interview with director Lewis Allen. I’m so incredibly pumped to receive my copy on October 25th, just in time to get a review posted before Halloween!

 

A pair of siblings from London (Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey) purchase a surprisingly affordable, lonely cliff-top house in Cornwall, only to discover that it actually carries a ghostly price—and soon they’re caught up in a bizarre romantic triangle from beyond the grave. Rich in atmosphere, The Uninvited,directed by Lewis Allen, was groundbreaking for the seriousness with which it treated the haunted-house genre, and it remains an elegant and eerie experience, featuring a classic score by Victor Young. A tragic family past, a mysteriously locked room, cold chills, bumps in the night—this gothic Hollywood classic has it all. – Synopsis from Criterion.com

 

Check out the super spooky trailer!

 

 

You Might Also Like These Classic Spooky Movie Reviews

The Innocents (1961)

The Innocents (1961)

House on Haunted Hill (1959)

House on Haunted Hill (1959)

The Changeling (1980)

The Changeling (1980)

 

 

 

 

 

 


Movies I Plan On Checking Out This Fall…

In my last post, I listed My Top 10 Spooky Movies For Fall. After doing some research, I’ve come up with five classic spooky movies that I haven’t seen but would like to see in the coming months. Does anyone know any of these? It was nice to get many of your opinions or additions to my last list. Any suggestions or movies that I should add to this list? 

Linked titles take you to IMDb. Photos take you to Amazon.com

The Innocents (1961)

Watch Trailer

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Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Watch Trailer

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House on Haunted Hill (1959)

Watch Trailer

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The Uninvited (1944)

Watch Trailer

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The Changeling (1980)

Watch Trailer


A Haunting Trip Down San Francisco Market Street… then and now…

 

I’ve never been to San Francisco, but I’ve often wanted to visit because it looks so beautiful, plus I’ve always been a HUGE fan of Armistead Maupin and his Tales of the City series of books that take place there.

But… have you seen this video?

I’ve gotten trapped into watching this whole thing many times in the last few years after I found it initially. It is a trip down Market Street. It was apparently originally thought to have been filmed in 1905, but was really filmed  four days before the big San Francisco earthquake in 1906.

It isn’t paranormal at all, but it is so haunting to watch for several reasons. First off, who isn’t impressed with footage from 1906? You can learn so much about history just from the video. For instance, these people were reckless and not afraid of getting run over or trampled by a horse! Apparently there weren’t any traffic laws. I am fascinated by the children chasing the cars down the street or running ahead of the camera. I wonder how many kids in 1906 would have even been able to identify a video camera and knew what it was? The heavy coats and dresses are interesting to me, considering it was filmed on April 14th (my birthday… it’s a stretch… but it’s another thing that makes it haunting). Also, maybe it’s just me… but it is strange to see a video from so long ago that shows people strolling, walking, and strutting just like we do today! You mean people didn’t walk differently 100 years ago? 🙂 I wonder if these people imagined we’d be watching and learning from them over 100 years later?

Secondly, imagining the destruction and lost life that happened just four days after the hustle and bustle of a normal day in San Francisco is truly haunting. According to USGS, it is estimated that 3,000 lives were lost and 28,000 buildings were destroyed.

 

 

I’m not sure if the same people who filmed the above video filmed the footage after the destruction, but it seems genius that it is filmed in the same manner. Both videos have been paired next to each other so that you can compare.

 

 

And lastly, a trip down the same street in 2005. The same hustle and bustle… only different. To me, the neatest things about this version are the cyclists and passersby that seem fascinated with the filming, just like in the original footage. And even cooler, it finishes off with the same historical building at the end of the street that apparently survived. I don’t know enough about San Francisco to tell you anything else about it… but it’s cool.

Will people watch and learn from us in 100 years?

 

 

 


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