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My Personal Experience with Mediums by David Almeida

Please enjoy another article that is very well written by David Almeida. Please check out his bio at the end of the post. Once again, Mr. Almeida has kindly given me permission to share this with you. Thanks, David!

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A person can easily say that mediumship is foolishness (I guess that sort of gives away my position on the matter).  It is my policy to report on my personal experiences in the “It’s what you actually saw, not what you think you saw” manner.  (Please note this remark is directed towards events that occur in the physical environment such as shadow people or hauntings).  I’m not certain if I have always stuck to this policy in my past writings.  With the supernatural, as with any topic whether it be politics, economics, or entertainment, people’s opinions naturally enter the discussion.  This article clearly demonstrates that fact.

 

When an unbeliever is personally touched by the spirit world, their attitude often changes. It’s like the people that we see on the Long Island Medium television show who receive spirit messages through Theresa Caputo.  We see the client exclaim in similar words “Wow.  How could she know that about me?” 

 

Being a spiritualist I can relate to this kind of wonderment.  It startles the person receiving a reading when a medium says something of a personal nature that could not possibly be known to him or her.  The first time I had a half hour session with the pastor of my former Spiritualist church, she made a statement that amazed me.  The pastor said, “You are into concepts.”  She barely knew me at the time.  This was during the time that I was writing The First Truth: A Book of Metaphysical Theories

 

While anyone can say that my pastor’s concept remark was coincidence, I find it interesting that she could have said just about anything concerning my character.  I believe it was during this session that I inquired with her about my suspicions regarding the Arthur Waite.  This question came from her mention of the name Arthur in a previous session and my realization of his connection to me.  She positively confirmed his identity, by asking me if this Arthur person swayed back and forth between good and bad.  This piece of information was among the few facts that I knew about him at the time.  Many people may find this sufficient evidence for what might be considered a grandiose claim, but it is consistent with several other experiences I have had with Mr. Waite.  I have discussed these experiences in other articles.

 

I am extremely careful in writing down my thoughts.  When I reduce my thoughts to writing, I intend to stand by it.  If I later find myself wrong about a particular statement I have written, or I discover a conflict with one of my theories, I am obliged to acknowledge my error.  In such a situation, all I can say is those famous last words “It seemed like a good idea at the time.”  While I am prepared to leave my ideas open to debate, I am duty-bound to defend my ideas.  Otherwise, there would be no point in sharing my articles with curious readers on the Internet.  Any theory can be refuted, no matter how well supported and officially endorsed they are.

 

I have seen the search results on Google that claim Theresa Caputo is a fake.  I did not venture onto any of these websites.  I have never met Mrs. Caputo, so I cannot personally attest to her mediumship ability.  However, I’m not sure that the show would air if the producers thought her spirit messages were bogus.  That revelation would reflect terribly on everyone involved in producing the show.  I know people will do anything for money, but even so, it’s seems to me that no one would risk their reputation on a faker. Putting your career on the line for a hoax is risky.  I would never knowingly associate myself with anything I recognized as a sham. 

 

I want to state for the record that a certain amount of skepticism is healthy and necessary in evaluating supernatural phenomena.  It goes without saying that one should not take everything he or she hears as the irrefutable truth.  In that regard, I consider myself to be a true skeptic, despite my feelings towards spirit communication and metaphysics.  My observations and conclusions are reliable when it comes to documenting what actually occurred in a particular situation. 

 

I have to admit that the practice objectivity is challenging when dealing with the supernatural.  Objectivity tends to be of little use in assessing spiritual or mystical experiences.  These are the kind of experiences that are labeled hallucinations and dreams by the skeptics.  If my statements in this article seem contradictory, then you are beginning to understand the deceptive and limited nature of objectivity.

 

I am not saying it’s impossible for Mrs. Caputo to be faking her talent.  Having seen her show a number of times, I feel it is reasonable to believe her mediumship ability is genuine. Many people would agree with my opinion.  Again a large number of people giving approval to a supernatural event, or to any situation, does not necessarily mean it is true.  However, the people I am referring to have first-hand knowledge of Mrs. Caputo’s mediumship ability.  If one chooses to disregard their personal testimony, then I do not know what to say.

 

Quite often the professed skeptics are nothing more than perpetuators of conspiracy theories.  I am thinking of the misinformed groups who continue to link the legendary Illuminati to various world domination conspiracies.  I fell for this nonsense in my early twenties.  I have out grown them since that time.  I like to be flexible in considering other people’s beliefs, but having followed many conspiracy theories in my younger days, I am of the opinion that the majority of these overblown rumors are unfounded.  There may be some truth to a few of these theories, but it’s hard to determine which parts are factual.

 

I could come up with many plausible reasons for why Mrs. Caputo and many other mediums are frauds.  By continuing in this manner, I would be doing a disservice to my readers.  Humans are meant to reach out to the hidden universe in search of new ideas and information.  I do not understand why some individuals feel the need to resist spiritual growth.  If we protect the status quo, we are only hurting ourselves.  The Truth will never be uncovered by thoughtlessly convincing people to maintain the notion of a closed universe.

 

Spiritualist mediums go through training.  After this, they spend what I believe is a year or two as student mediums.  They ply their skills once a month by giving readings to church attendees.  At some point, the student’s mediumship skills are tested for accuracy by an independent certifying board.  I have met some remarkable student mediums. 

 

Am I of the opinion that all mediums are equal in their ability to communicate spirit messages?  Of course not.  Many mediums maintain an outstanding track record, while others have moderate success in their readings.  The disparity in accuracy between mediums can be wide.  It’s important to remember that the medium is reliant on unknown entities for their information.  There is no known system for getting consistent results.  Even the best mediums can have an off day through no fault of their own.  I should also acknowledge the fact that there are excellent mediums who are not certified by any Spiritualist church. 

 

Interestingly, I have noticed that few mediums in the Spiritualist tradition make future predictions.  It confirms my suspicion that common spirits are no more capable of predicting the future than living beings.  I liken future predictions to the principle of cause and effect.  This universal law is responsible for the infinite possibilities that exist as our future realities.  Some of these “alternate realities” become future probabilities.  Both spirits and mediums are able to perceive the probable future.  This does not mean that a particular probability will unfold in the present.

 

Based my personal experience with mediums, I am convinced that spirit communication is a reality. A close-minded person will never acknowledge the truth.  No matter what a medium says to the skeptic, he or she is more than likely to deny the accuracy of the message given.  I do not feel the statement of an absolute skeptic is a reliable measure of a medium’s competence.  The assessment of reasonable and balanced person is much more useful in gaging a medium’s ability.

 

As a side discussion, I would like to make a brief comment on the paranormal investigator.  These special investigators are helpful in substantiating or disproving a supernatural claim.  By their nature, paranormal investigators are inclined to believe in the supernatural.  Otherwise, they would not be interested in pursuing the unexplained. As I already stated, I feel that this open-mindedness is an excellent quality for an investigator to possess.  Paranormal investigators minimize their natural curiosity with reasonableness and sensibility.  They look for “proof” or “evidence” of supernatural manifestations by using modern technology. 

 

I once requested the assistance of a paranormal investigation group to document the existence of supernatural activity in my former residence.  This was more than ten years ago and took place before I became acutely aware of nonphysical reality.  The investigators did not obtain the evidence I was seeking, but I was impressed with their professionalism.

 

 

Bio

David Almeida is a Spiritualist and researcher of Rosicrucian philosophy and esoteric knowledge. David is a past article contributor to the Sedona Journal of Emergence. He is also a Board Certified Hypnotist and Reiki healer. David is the author of The First Truth: A Book of Metaphysical Theories and Illusion of the Body: Introducing the Body Alive Principle. Both books can be purchased at Amazon.com. Visit http://www.findyourdivinelight.com

 

You Might Also Like: 

How to Evaluate the Authenticity of an Observer’s Supernatural Encounter (Big Séance)

Sylvia Browne: In her own words (Big Séance)

Sylvia Browne: Are members of the “spiritual community” turning on her?  (Big Séance)

 


Sylvia Browne: In her own words…

My last post on the recent and ongoing backlash and criticism of the psychic medium, Sylvia Browne, brought on more discussion and comments than we’ve seen here at the Big Séance in a while. It’s still a hot topic among bloggers and in online paranormal and spiritual circles.  

Since that post I’ve discovered that Sylvia responded in a statement. 

“For more than 50 years as a spiritual psychic and guide, when called upon to either help authorities with missing person cases or to help families with questions about their loved ones, I have been more right than wrong. If ever there was a time to be grateful and relieved for being mistaken, this is that time. Only God is right all the time. My heart goes out to Amanda Berry, her family, the other victims and their families. I wish you a peaceful recovery.” – From the Huffington Post

Regarding the other similar highly publicized case involving Shawn Hornbeck in 2007, Browne’s publicist told CNN “She cannot possibly be 100 percent correct in each and every one of her predictions. She has, during a career of over 50 years, helped literally tens of thousands of people.”

Psychic Medium Sylvia Browne

 

Since it is highly unlikely that Sylvia Browne would pop in to defend herself on my blog, and since I own many of her books, I decided I would highlight just a few of her statements that seem to fit this situation. 

 

“I have never used a ‘ringer’ in my life, or participated in a hoax. I would never forfeit my credibility, my career, and my life’s work for the sake of a cheap trick.”
From Life on the Other Side: A Psychic’s Tour of the Afterlife

 

“Don’t get me wrong, I’ve made some mistakes along the way — and I mean some real whoppers — that if you don’t know the whole story could make it look as if my integrity was a little blurry from time to time. Again, ask me and I’ll tell you exactly how stupid I’ve been, how naive and inappropriately trusting of the wrong people I can be, and just how incredibly unpsychic I am about myself. But accuse me of ever being deliberately dishonest, or indiscreet, or greedy and ambitious at someone else’s expense, or careless about the issue of integrity, you’ll have a fight on your hands, and that includes the subject of celebrities, both past and present.”
From Visits from the Afterlife: The Truth about Hauntings, Spirits, and Reunions with Lost Loved Ones

 

“I love being right. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t. My career depends on my being right a lot more often than I’m wrong, and I’ve been tested at somewhere between 85- and 90-percent accuracy as a psychic. Averaging, let’s say, twenty clients a day for fifty years, plus another forty years of lectures, print interviews, radio and television appearances, added to several decades of very private pro bono work with the medical and psychiatric communities and various law enforcement agencies, and my own extensive research and writing, I wouldn’t have the strength, the skill, or the courage to try to calculate the number of hours of information I’ve transmitted in my sixty-six years on earth this time around, and I’d be ecstatic to find out that 95 to 90 percent of that information has been accurate and give all the credit to God where it belongs. 

There’s no doubt about it, either, that when I miss something, I miss it, and when I’m wrong, I’ll be the first to point it out. The terrorist attacks of September 11? Not one inkling. The sniper killings that held the Washington, D.C., area hostage in the fall of 2002? I called Lindsay and recorded detailed descriptions of the two suspects several days before any arrests were made. They turned out to be very accurate descriptions of the two alleged suspects who were mistakenly surrounded by the authorities at a gas station and completely exonerated several hours later. I’ve been thrilled to hear it when I turned out to be wrong about the outcome of a missing-persons case or two, and heartbroken on more occasions when I turned out to be right.”
From Visits from the Afterlife: The Truth about Hauntings, Spirits, and Reunions with Lost Loved Ones

 

“Psychics don’t solve crimes. Law enforcement solves crimes. We simply bring another set of tools to what’s usually a long, exhaustive, difficult process of identifying criminals and putting them behind bars. We’re no different from the criminal profilers, the geographic profilers, the forensic anthropologists, the sculptors and other experts who were viewed with initial skepticism until they proved their worth, as any participant in an investigation should be expected to do.”
Included in her section on “Psychic Forensics” from Phenomenon: Everything You Need to Know About the Paranormal

 

“However, Mr. Randi and other anti-psychic skeptics have called me a liar and a charlatan numerous times, and there are even entire Websites devoted to trying to stop my work for God. How miserable is it that instead of helping others, some people choose to start atheistic or skeptical societies and ridicule, or even try to destroy, the men and women who are trying to help others?”
From
Mystical Traveler: How to Advance to a Higher Level of Spirituality

 

Update for 5/13/13

I have been reading Prophecy: What the Future Holds for You by Sylvia Browne and had actually started it just before the women in Ohio were found. Today I came across a passage that I sure wish I would have found before I put this post together. In this particular section she was discussing the prophesies of Edgar Cayce. It’s the perfect response to this situation. I probably wouldn’t have even needed the passages I included above. Here it is.

“There are prophesies of Edgar Cayce’s that haven’t come true. I wouldn’t presume to speak for him, but my guess would be that his explanation for that would be similar to mine when I find out I was wrong about a reading or a prediction. Any prophet, psychic, clairvoyant, medium or other paranormalist who claims to be accurate 100 percent of the time is a fraud and a liar. Only God is right 100 percent of the time. All the rest of us can do is receive and transmit information we’re given, and stay out of the way as best we can. We can’t take credit for any of the information, but blame for inaccuracy falls justifiably on our shoulders, because it means that somewhere along the line we misspoke, misunderstood, misinterpreted and/or somehow involuntarily interfered, and the messages suffered in the translation.”

 

 


Proof of Heaven…

A while back I finished a book that has been extremely popular in recent months. Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey into the Afterlife by Eben Alexander, M.D. tells the author’s story of his journey into the afterlife, or an atypical Near Death Experience (or NDE), while his physical body was in a coma. Before the experience, this bow tie wearing doctor, like most of his kind, was not a believer in the NDE phenomenon. It is a fascinating and miraculous true story. Once again, I have to tell you that often the subject of a book, or in this case a book written by a neurosurgeon, will intimidate me into assuming I’ll have a hard time comprehending or really “getting” it. That wasn’t the case for this book at all. Other than some medical explanations and terminology that gave me cinnamon bun eyes, I very much “got” this book. 

 

Not only was Eben interviewed by Oprah, but the story really got the discussion started when it was featured in Newsweek back in October. Recently I blogged about some annoying comments made when the article was discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher. I love the show, but the fact that several members of the panel, including Bill himself, treated this phenomena and Dr. Alexander’s experience as a joke really bummed me. Unfortunately, you can find more of the same kind of criticism by skeptics making fun of the story online. I won’t link those here. 

 

If you’re into NDE research or enjoy reading about the phenomena, you should definitely check this out and add it to your library. My guess is that many of you already have. 

If you’re interested, I’ll leave you with an interview of the author by Bob Olson on the AfterlifeTVChannel.

 


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