Tag Archives: a halloween housewarming

Halloween Memories and Traditions with Special Guests – The Big Séance Podcast: My Paranormal World #19

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Well it is finally here. It is the week of Halloween, and in this final Halloween episode, I invite several past guests to share their favorite Halloween memories and traditions! Hear contributions from Annie Wilder, Sara Wiseman, Lee Allen Howard, Karen A. Dahlman, Janice Carlson, Rob Gutro, and Jim Harold.

 

 

 

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Halloween Memories and Traditions

 

In this episode:

A Halloween Housewarming in 1911

A special return visit from Meth Hazel

Returning from episode 2 of the Big Séance Podcast, our next guest, Annie Wilder has a cool story from a Halloween night a few years ago. Now you have to remember that she lives in a haunted house, and when she mentions “the sisters” and “Leon”, those are spirits that are known to reside with her in the home.

Sara Wiseman joined us on October 2, 2014. I really enjoyed that conversation. She may have the sweetest and most calming voice ever, but you might want to briefly turn the lights on for this recent memory.

My friend Lee Allen Howard was with us for the September 11, 2014 episode. He is a medium and metaphysician, but he’s also an author, and he writes some horrifying things. And from his memories, it kind of makes you understand just where it all came from.

Next up is Karen A. Dahlman, who has been on the show twice, July 23, and October 16, of 2014. I absolutely love her story, and Karen was nice enough to send in a very special photo for all of us to enjoy.

Karen A. Dahlman and friend, Halloween 1977, The Big Séance Podcast

Karen A. Dahlman (right) and friend, Halloween 1977

Medium and psychic, Janice Carlson, joined us on August 27, 2014. She’s really fun to talk to, and she joins us again now to share this thought-provoking memory of a childhood Halloween. She also wanted to share an article she wrote about Halloween. **Janice’s drawing is coming soon!**

On September 18, 2014, Rob Gutro joined us to talk about Pets and the Afterlife. Here’s a memory from Rob.  

If you’re a regular listener of the Big Séance Podcast, you know just how much respect I have for our final guest tonight, a man who has influenced me greatly! I was so very honored to have Jim Harold, of the Paranormal Podcast, join me back on Sept 25, 2014. I invited him to come back to share his thoughts on a favorite tradition on Halloween. If you’re a parent, you’ll relate to this one.

A special credit and “thank you” goes out to the incredibly talented Tim Prasil, for writing the really funny story for Meth Hazel’s appearance tonight. Thanks for playing along with us, and sharing your time and talent, Tim. You’ll actually be hearing from Tim, who is a writer, in a future episode of the podcast. You can learn more about him at timprasil.wordpress.com.

 

Don’t forget!! Are you a regular listener? Please e-mail (or call, or SpeakPipe) with where you’re listening from, and how you’re listening! I’d appreciate it! Patrick@BigSeance.com

 

Sam Haynes, Spine ChillersSpooky Music featured on this episode is from Sam Haynes. You can find more about Sam and his music at http://www.hauntmusic.co.uk/. Thanks, Sam!

 

The Big Seance Podcast can be found right here, on Apple PodcastsSpotifyTuneIn RadioStitcherGoogle Play Music, and iHeart Radio. Please subscribe, submit a rating, or share with a fellow paranerd! Do you have any comments or feedback? Please contact me at Patrick@BigSeance.com. Consider recording your voice feedback directly from your device on my SpeakPipe page! You can also call the show and leave feedback at (775) 583-5563 (or 7755-TELL-ME). I would love to include your voice feedback in a future show. The candles are already lit, so come on in and join the séance!


Planning a Halloween Party (in 1911)

As many of you are no doubt planning themes for Halloween get-togethers next month, I thought maybe Ms. Ruby Ross Goodnow could help you plan. Actually, the party below, held on “Hallowe’en” at “eight o’ clock” in 1911, was also meant to be a housewarming party, for a brand new home, perhaps a bungalow or craftsman like the one pictured below. I found this article, originally published in the October 1911 issue of The Delineator, a few years ago and I just love it! (Note that a yearly subscription was $1. Sweet!) I’m considering planning a Halloween get together myself, and using this retro article as a starting point for a turn of the century theme!

 

The cover of the October 1911 issue of Delineator.

The cover of the October 1911 issue of The Delineator.

 

From the October 1911 issue of The Delineator:

___________________________________

Entertainment in October

Conducted by Ruby Ross Goodnow

Mrs. Goodnow will be glad to help you with any kind of entertainment. Write her for suggestions, giving the exact date of your party, enclosing a stamped, self-addressed envelope for reply.

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A HALLOWE’EN HOUSEWARMING

The Dr. John F. and Mary Reddy House in Medford Oregon. Photo (from the National Register of Historic Places) was taken in 1911, the same year of construction.

The Dr. John F. and Mary Reddy House in Medford Oregon. This photo (from the National Register of Historic Places) is not of the house featured in this article, but was taken in 1911, the same year of its construction, and the same year as this issue of Delineator.

We had moved into our new home and, of course, we wished to welcome our friends beneath our roof-tree, so we planned a Hallowe’en housewarming, which was the jolliest affair ever.

We had some little brown-prints made of the new house, and sent one of these to each of our friends enclosed in the following note:

“Our latch-string now hangs on the outside!

Won’t you come and use it on Hallowe’en, at eight o’ clock?”

We invited all our friends, old and young and in-betweens. And we opened all our house-we knew that the cellar would be as interesting to Uncle John as the attic would be to Great-Aunt Martha. We had Jack-o’-lanterns on the gate-posts, and in spooky corners of the cellars, and in the attic.

All the young people were given cards, very much like dance-cards, with spaces for engagements in regular order: “9 o’ clock, Mr. B—-, cellar stairs; 9:30 Mr. C—-, library davenport; 10, Mr. D—-, kitchen-table,” and so on. This arrangement of conversational “dates” kept the young people scrambling all over the house, up-stairs and down, and there was no possibility of stagnation!

And we served refreshments all over the house, too. We had a brand-new barrel of apples in the cellar; a huge pot of coffee and little squares of hot gingerbread in the kitchen; half a dozen bowls of nuts in the attic; a platter of sandwiches in the living-room; a huge bowl of fruit-punch in the dining-room; a silver dish of mints in the library and several platters of home-made candy in the various bedrooms.

At half after eleven we all met in the big living-room and ranged ourselves around the great fireplace. Then my husband very solemnly lighted the first fire on the new hearthstone, and our guests all toasted our new home. Then we told ghost stories, and roasted chestnuts, and popped corn, and counted apple-seeds until well after the charmed hour of midnight!   C.B.A.

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A few notes: 

I tried to do some quick research to find out exactly what is meant by “brown-prints” in this article. I only find information leading me to a type of photography. Did they send photos of the new house with the invitations? 

Though 1911 is a bit after the Victorian days, up to around the 1900s Halloween meant socializing (clearly pointed out in the article), parlor games, and was often thought of as a romantic holiday for young people. This was a time when young girls or ladies would practice innocent rituals or perhaps attempt to contact the spirit world to learn who their future husband would be. The roasting of various nuts, counting apple seeds, etc, was often used as a kind of fortune-telling at these gatherings. In those days Halloween was less about spookiness and death. 

For more information about the history and traditions of Halloween, check out HALLOWEEN: An American Holiday, an American Tradition by Lesley Pratt Bannatyne.  

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