Tag Archives: 1929

Pictorial Tour of the Beautiful Fox Theatre in St. Louis… just because…

This may seem a bit off topic, but these historic theatres are just so mysteriously beautiful to me. Built and designed in what has been called “Siamese Byzantine” style, The Fox Theatre in St. Louis is one of my current obsessions. I’ve taken so many pictures on each visit that I had a very hard time narrowing them down for this post. Like most theatres of its kind, the Fox Theatre was originally built as a movie palace in 1929… for “talkies”. It sat vacant and forgotten for several years and then in the 80s it was purchased and a $2 million renovation brought this beauty back to life. It has seen the biggest stars, and each year serves as temporary home to national tours of Broadway productions and concerts. There’s really no theatre like it! But wait! There actually is a paranormal element to this post. The Fox Theatre is supposedly home to two ghosts. I haven’t met them, but I hope to… someday. 

Not a great picture… but I couldn’t NOT show you these amazing ticket booths.

The lobby during the holidays.

Ceiling in the lobby.

Lobby. And at the top of those stairs is a restaurant for the big spenders. (Totally reminds me of the Harmonia Gardens in Hello Dolly.)

Restaurant in the lobby.

This hangs above the restaurant at the top of the lobby stairs.

Just one of the traditional “ghost lights” at the Fox Theatre.

Took a ride in this old elevator. I think it’s beautiful!

Inside the theatre (obviously).

Entrance to the backstage area.

One of the many hallways underneath the theatre.

Some of the original projection equipment outside of the screening room in the basement (next picture).

The screening room in the basement of the theatre.

Can you believe this is just one of the men’s rooms? Of course then it would have been called a “smoking lounge”.  I love the floor and the blue on the walls.

Old phone booths in the men’s room.

 

Related:

Urban Exploration and Forgotten Theatres (Big Séance)

 

 


More from the Old Yearbooks…

 

If you liked my last post, Collecting Someone Else’s Memories, then here are some more interesting photos from my collection of old yearbooks from Lexington, Missouri. 

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook (56th Annual Catalogue).

 

From the 1921-1922 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

Home Economics classes. From the 1921-1922 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

The “L Club”. From the 1921-1922 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

French Club. From the 1921-1922 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

From the 1924-1925 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School Yearbook.

 

From the 1924-1925 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School Yearbook.

 

From the 1924-1925 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School Yearbook.

 

From the 1924-1925 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School Yearbook.

 

From the 1924-1925 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School Yearbook.

 

From the 1925-1926 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

From the 1926-1927 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

From the 1926-1927 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

From the 1928-1929 “Final Hatch” Lexington High School yearbook.

 

 


Collecting Someone Else’s Memories…

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook

 

One of my many incredibly nerdy hobbies is collecting old school yearbooks from my hometown of Lexington, Missouri. It’s a sleepy small town now, but at one time around the turn of the 20th century, Lexington was booming and was the home of several colleges as well as several public school buildings. The oldest yearbook I own is from the  Lexington College for Young Women from 1910. Most of my other yearbooks are Lexington High School yearbooks from the 1920s that used to be named “The Final Hatch.” 

I love looking through them and dreaming about what my hometown was like then. And I try to imagine what life was like for the students. Did they go through some of the same drama and problems that my students experience? Was there bullying? What were the expectations? As a teacher, it is also very cool to see course descriptions and curriculum printed for several of the departments. That fascinates me. History! It’s also neat to see the advertisement pages in the back. Some of the businesses had 2-digit phone numbers, if they had a phone at all.

 

From the 1910 Lexington College for Young Women Yearbook

 

And, of course, I wonder what it was like to be a teacher in those days. Several of my yearbooks were originally owned by Verna Owen (pictured below). The only thing I know about Verna is that she taught in Lexington for many years. The inside cover of one of them is even signed. And, from the writing on this page, we see that someone knew her as Aunt Verna. This tells me that I’m probably at least the third owner of this particular yearbook. Sometimes when going through them I thank Ms. Owen out loud for taking good care of her yearbooks so that I could enjoy them now. 

 

My 1928 yearbook belonged to and was signed by Verna M. Owen… She was a member of the faculty.

 

Many of the photos below are from one of the old high school buildings that no longer stands. I never got to see it in my lifetime. I sure wish I could go back in time and take a tour!

 

Part of the Freshman Class from 1921-1922.

 

From 1921-1922.

 

Teacher Training (for students) at Lexington High School 1922.

 

From 1926-1927.

 

Part of the Senior Class of 1925-1926.

 

From the 1922 yearbook. This building is no longer standing and was located where the Lexington Post Office is today.

 

The next building to serve as Lexington High School would later be where I attended middle school from the fourth through the eighth grade. It was a pretty large building that opened its doors to students in 1927. I have a lot of memories from this old building. I still dream about it often. Unfortunately, it no longer stands. A sad and strangely small-looking empty lot sits in its place.

 

Artist Conception of the “new” Jr./Sr. High School that opens the next year. This is from the 1926-1927 yearbook.

 

One of the very first pictures of the main corridor of the “new” building. From the 1927-1928 yearbook.

 

From the 1928-1929 yearbook. This was the second year in the “new” building. This would have been what I knew as the choir room when I was in middle school.

 

From 1924-1925.

 

From 1924-1925.

 

I was very sad when the building was torn down. I was away at college at the time, but my best friend took the picture below and sent it to me. Thanks to a group of high school students, I was able to purchase a brick from this building. It sits here on my desk. 

 

 

 


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