Tag Archives: 1849

Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri…

It is a cemetery that could keep you busy for days… weeks even. And it’s the largest and possibly the most beautiful cemetery I’ve ever seen. Opening in 1849, Bellefontaine (pronounced “bell fountain” by most St. Louisans) consists of 314 acres of park-like beauty with mausoleums as far as the eye can see. Too many to count. Even with a driving tour map it’s easy to get lost. But trust me, it’s worth it. Among other movers and shakers from the region, you’ll find the resting places of Adolphus Busch (beer giant), William Clark, Sara Teasdale, and the infamous Lemp family. You can find more beautiful photos on Bellefontaine’s Facebook page. There are also several resources on their beautiful website. When Joe and I visited we were greeted by really friendly staff, and they went out of their way to make our visit a nice one.  

Enjoy these photos from our visit…

 

“The Girl In the Glass Box” Herman Luyties 1871-1921

 

 

 

 

The family mausoleum of the infamous Lemps.

 

The family mausoleum of the infamous Lemps.

 

Back window. Family mausoleum of the infamous Lemps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Clark 1770 – 1838

 

Busch Mausoleum
Adolphus Busch 1839 – 1913
Lilly Anheuser Busch 1844 – 1928

 

Busch Mausoleum
Adolphus Busch 1839 – 1913
Lilly Anheuser Busch 1844 – 1928

 

 

 

If you’re hungry for more information on those buried at Bellefontaine, check out Movers and Shakers, Scalawags and suffragettes: Tales from Bellefontaine Cemetery by Carol Ferring Shepley. I picked this book up at the cemetery office. It’s proudly shelved in my personal library. 

 

 

 

 

 


Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri…

For those of us who love a walk or a picnic in a beautiful old cemetery, or for those people who simply like to look at photos of historical locations, I give you part 1 of a 3-part series (wow, that sounds fancy) of photos of cemeteries from my home town… Lexington, Missouri. Several days ago I went back to visit the family and was inspired to drop by all of the cemeteries in town. Though I have interesting connections and memories from 2 of the 3, I had forgotten (or maybe didn’t realize it before) how truly cool these historic pieces of land are. I think many people from Lexington don’t even realize that such beautiful and historical gems are just hanging out and waiting to be noticed.  I wonder if this is the case with many small towns around the country. Although, I must say that part of what makes them so beautiful to me is the quietness and the fact that I was almost always alone for each visit.

At each cemetery I brought a digital audio recorder along and had respectful conversation with any spirits who may have been present (hopefully there will be more about this in a future post). I’m not a photographer, but I hope you enjoy the photos.

Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, Missouri – Founded in 1849


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