Monthly Archives: October 2013

In My Opinion: Because a Long Island medium said so!

 

Photo Attribution: John Stephen Dwyer, CC-BY-SA-3.0.

Photo Attribution: John Stephen Dwyer, CC-BY-SA-3.0.

Just a few days ago, I shared a post from one of my favorite blogs on Twitter. If you follow my tweets, you’ll know I share things frequently as I read articles that resonate with me. It will not be a surprise to know that the topic of the post I shared had to do with making yourself available for souls who want to communicate. Not long after my tweet, I received a series of incredibly negative responses that reprimanded me for the share, and assumed I was ignorant of any paranormal or psychic research. Because it continued to go downhill without a chance for me to fairly stand up for myself or explain, I ended up using the block feature for the very first time. Because of the block, I do not have access to those tweets, otherwise I would have quoted the whole conversation in this post. 

The Twitter user that I blocked seemed to be a psychic or medium of some kind… or at least wanted to be one really badly, and to my knowledge, I’ve never been in contact with her before that moment. Have you noticed there are about eleventy-thousand (on average) psychics on Twitter now? Don’t get me wrong. I love psychics. I love reading about and learning from psychics. But there are a ton of wannabe psychics that clearly have not earned the title, just deciding this week that they’re psychic after watching a few episodes of Long Island Medium (which she actually referenced in her argument). And I’m not dogging wannabe psychics. I’m not even insulting Theresa Caputo. I think she’s got a great show and seems to be the real deal. I’d love to be psychic and continue to read and learn about channeling and intuition. But in this paranormal craze, just like the zillions of ghost hunter teams that pop up every day, perhaps it is just a little too easy to start a Twitter profile and call yourself a psychic medium. 

Psychic lady tagged another supposed psychic to a few of her responses to me and requested help in educating me and setting me straight. Among several other things, I was told that I was irresponsibly sharing information that was dangerous, not recommended, etc. You know, the same old textbook responses. Ghosts are bad. Spirit communication is dangerous. You’ll pull something out you can’t put back in. You have no idea how to deal with a spirit. Only demons come through a Ouija board. Only a psychic can help. Have you heard of smudging? You need to do some research or read a book (one of my “favorite” comments.)

Most of this was before I even had a chance to respond. I felt like I was in the scene from Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion (my favorite movie) where Romy tries to enlighten Heather Moony… who is a smoker.

Romy: Heather, um, has anyone ever told you that smoking can kill you?

Heather: No. No one. Thank you.

Clearly, know-it-all psychic lady has not followed my blog and doesn’t know much about me… and she doesn’t know that we share some of the same opinions… though she probably just isn’t interested. I’m exaggerating and paraphrasing, of course, but psychic lady continued on. If you “dabble” and play games with spirit for fun, it’ll getcha! Well Theresa Caputo says _______. You see, the thing that absolutely sends me over the edge is when someone tells me their opinion of something spiritual or metaphysical as if it is fact. Even if you think it is fact, don’t correct me. I could point to many different books by different psychics and gurus that give multiple and sometimes incredibly different answers to the same mystical question (which is something ELSE that drives me batty!) 

In just a few responses, I tried to explain that I was well aware of the usual concerns and dangers and was not an idiot, though I appreciated her concern (I lied.) I told her that I read many books, including many by psychic mediums. I shared my belief that just because some spirits may be trouble or negative, doesn’t mean that we should avoid all spirit contact. Her responses continued, including a promise to never follow me or take my advice.  This random person, whose profile summary simply reads “a psychic medium”, was missing some of the “love and light” that is so very common these days among people who share her title. She needed a little bit of that… and I may or may not have shared that concern with her. For her, it was more like “hate and dark”.     

What I didn’t get a chance to share with psychic lady is this: If only YOU are hearing or seeing it, if your guide passed along a message meant for you, or if a parapsychologist or scientist can’t prove it, then you are free to tell me your belief or your opinion based on your amazing experience, but do not talk down to me as if you know all of life’s secrets and have nothing better to do than tweet about it with the TV remote in your hand. Gosh I hope I’ve never come across that way in my own writing and blogging. You’d tell me, right? 

 

So this has clearly been me venting, but it is also a general concern that I’ve had recently. Too many people are saying “this is how it is”. Too many “experts” are going out of their way to correct others, saying things like “No. You’re wrong. That’s not how it works on the other side. It goes like this.” Really?  

 

Okay vent officially over. Thoughts on this? Talk about an almost Halloween DOWNER! 🙂 I’ll check in with everyone on November 1st to see if everyone is recuperating from sugar highs (or in our case, drying out from the 80% chance of rain we’re expecting for trick or treaters.) 

 

You might also like:

Defining "The Big Séance" (Big Séance)

Defining “The Big Séance” (Big Séance)

My Personal Experience with Mediums by David Almeida (Big Séance)

My Personal Experience with Mediums by David Almeida (Big Séance)

Why do we assume? (Big Séance)

Why do we assume? (Big Séance)

 


Vintage: A Ghost Story (for the gay teen in your life)

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Do you know a young gay man or a teen in the LGBT community? Are they into ghost stories or spirit communication? Perhaps they’re just a general paranerd like most of us. If this young person fits into any of these categories, you really need to direct them to this book! 

 

From the author’s website

A lonely boy walking along a highway one autumn evening meets the boy of his dreams, a boy who happens to have died decades ago and haunts the road. Awkward crushes, both bitter and sweet, lead him to face youthful dreams and childish fears. With its cast of offbeat friends, antiques, and Ouija boards, Vintage is not your typical romance but does offer readers a memorable blend of dark humor, chills and love. 

A finalist for the Andre Norton Award and Gaylactic Spectrum Award!

 

I think his was the original cover of Vintage, which matches the one that is on my shelf.

I think this was the original cover of Vintage, which matches the one that is on my shelf.

I read this book when it was originally published in 2007. As a 29-year-old, I was just getting into reading and went through a year of doing it obsessively. I’m still obsessed with it, but back then I was reading a book a week and clearly trying to make up for lost time. Vintage: A Ghost Story, which fits into the category of young adult fiction, is the kind of book that I really wish existed when I was growing up in those awkward teen years. Growing up gay or coming out of the closet is sometimes very lonely, and it’s hard enough without having to pretend that movies, TV, and books apply to your life. When was the last time you saw a major motion picture focused on a gay love story? Exactly. Sometimes I wonder if I would have started reading years ago if this book and others like it were around just 10 or 15 years earlier. 

This book also found me in the very early stages of my developing paranormal interests and my “spiritual shift”. I remember I read it in the fall and enjoyed all its spooky elements, like the Ouija board, cemeteries, etc. Something else that stands out is that I had just started collecting old high school yearbooks from my home town of Lexington, Missouri at this time. Most of them are from the 1920s. Reading about a ghost boyfriend who died in an earlier time made going through that first yearbook very interesting.  

 

Thank you, Steve Berman!

 

Related Links: 

Book Notes on Vintage: A Ghost Story by Steve Berman (Literary Magpie)

Interview with Steve Berman (Reviews by Jessewave)

LGBTQ characters in YA fiction & LGBTQ YA Authors (Gay YA) 

 

 


From Pumpkins to Jack-O-Lanterns 2013

My pumpkin before carving. I carved while listening to as many classic Halloween songs as I could find on YouTube. Then I had to clean finger prints off of my phone. It’s funny how I always forget about the smell of a pumpkin. You smell it as soon as you make the first cut. It was instantly nostalgic to me and took me back to a very early memory of probably one of my first jack-o-lanterns at our first house when I was very young. We had an enclosed front porch with an old door with a window , that led to the kitchen. For some reason our jack-o-lantern was inside that front porch, rather than outside. I remember sitting and watching through the window as the jack-o-lantern flickered and glowed.

 

 

 

 

 

This year we broke tradition and I carved Joe’s pumpkin as well. I tried to go for something different… something with a sinister look in the eyes and not quite so chipper. (Ahem… this punkin’ head is not meant to be a representation of Joe.)

 

 

I like how my punkin’ head on the right seems to be eyeballing Joe’s pumpkin. Don’t look too close. The one on the left is being illuminated by a sparkly Christmas candle.

 

Once again, the sparkly Christmas candle seems to be highlighted in the photo.

 

This is usually Meril’s signature jack-o-lantern look. Joe helped him. I think it gets bigger every year.

 

We have a plethora of various pumpkin carving tools from mostly cheap sets by "Pumpkin Masters". We purchased a rather expensive set online last year. I found that this $10 set from Target is just as good or better than any of them. I recommend it!

We have a plethora of various pumpkin carving tools from mostly cheap sets by “Pumpkin Masters”. We purchased a rather expensive set online last year. I found that this $10 set from Target is just as good or better than any of them. I recommend it!

 

You might also like:

Pumpkins and the Annual Trip to Rombach’s Farm (2013) (Big Séance) 

From Pumpkins to Jack-O-Lanterns 2012 (Big Séance) 

2012 Family of Pumpkins (Big Séance)

 

 

 

 


An Evening With The Uninvited (1944)

Last night Meril and I were burrowing in blankets on a chilly and windy evening at home alone, as Joe is away for work this week. We decided to catch up on another film on my list of movies to check out this fall. The weather the last few evenings here in the St. Louis area could not have been more perfect for an old black and white spooky film, so we made hot beverages (well I did, anyway), lit several candles, and popped in the recently released 1944 film The Uninvited. The cast includes Ray Milland, Ruth Hussey, Donald Crisp, Cornelia Otis Skinner, Dorothy Stickney, Barbara Everest, Alan Napier, and Gail Russell.

When it was over, we went out for our bedtime walk. Not only was it bitterly cold, but the earlier rain and wind had turned many of the trees naked for the first time this season. The misty cloud cover in the moonlit sky created an eerie, muted, black and white scene. Our day was closing with quite the Hollywood ending, minus having to retire to a quiet and cold bedroom by ourselves. I resisted turning the heat on and imagined we lived in an earlier time, wishing we had an old fireplace to take the chill away.

 

Some of my brief thoughts about the film

Meril watching (or not) The Uninvited.

Meril watching (or not) The Uninvited.

It appears Meril missed quite a bit of it, but I loved the movie. In this DVD, released by The Criterion Collection, the film is completely remastered and presented in its original aspect ratio on widescreen televisions. For the few times I got lost in the plot, I was able to refer to the very informative booklet included with the DVD. It includes several pages (with photos) of an essay by critic Farran Smith Nehme and a 1997 interview with Lewis Allen, who was actually a first-time director for this film.

The special features include a “visual essay” by filmmaker Michael Almereyda, which discussed some of the details of the film, the people involved, etc. It was very detailed and interesting. One of the things he mentions is how Gail Russell, who plays Stella, was plucked out of high school by the studio for her beauty. She was horribly shy, not confident, and the stress and anxiety drove her to drinking at such a young age. It was the alcohol that killed her at the age of 36. Apparently it was a common opinion, even by the director, that she was a poor actor with a studio contract who they were stuck with. Since I found her performance to be beautiful, it all surprised me. I felt that Donald Crisp, who was a respected academy award-winning actor by this time, had a horrible performance. It is said that at the time he was insulted to have to work with such a newcomer with no talent and experience. With the exception of Crisp, I thought the cast was spectacular! But what do I know?

I also want to point out that this 1944 film did an excellent job on several scenes with incredibly spooky ectoplasmic ghost manifestations. I expected to laugh at dated effects, but they really held up and are actually quite beautiful and impressive for 1944.

The film includes an original song, Stella by Starlight, which in the plot is written by one of the main characters, and in real life was later arranged with lyrics and covered by many famous artists. Here’s an overly dramatic but beautiful orchestral version. It is definitely not this dramatic in the film.

 

 

A haunting bit of information regarding this song was shared in the special features. Apparently in 1961, Gail Russell was known to frequently call into a particular radio station and request to hear Stella by Starlight. It is rumored that the night before she was found dead (apparently alcohol related), she had called in for her traditional request. 

Like many of these old films that I like, if you require your spooky old movies to include the classic old house (a beautiful and massive one), having to use candles in place of electricity, a séance scene (which you KNOW I enjoyed), and some really fantastic ghostly moaning, then add this to your list for sure! Click HERE to see the original trailer for the film. 

 

Next up! This year’s pumpkins turn into Jack-O-Lanterns!

You might also like: 

Danvers State Insane Asylum and Session 9 (Big Séance)

Danvers State Insane Asylum and Session 9 (Big Séance)

Rosemary's Baby (1968) (Big Séance)

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) (Big Séance)

The Conjuring Movie Review (Big Séance)

The Conjuring Movie Review (Big Séance)

 

 


Some Halloween Poetry On This Chilly Autumn Evening

On this chilly autumn evening, I’ve been bundled and working my way through A Halloween Reader: Poems, Stories, and Plays from Halloweens Past, edited by Lesley Pratt Bannatyne. You’ll find tons of great things in this book and I love Ms. Bannatyne. I can’t write poetry, and I have to work very hard at reading it. However, I do like these two, also included in Lesley’s book, and both in the public domain. I like that they were written in a time period that has really been resonating with me lately. And with 10 days till Halloween, they’re totally appropriate for putting you in the mood. 

 

All Souls (1909)

Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton

I

A THIN moon faints in the sky o’erhead,
And dumb in the churchyard lie the dead.
Walk we not, Sweet, by garden ways,
Where the late rose hangs and the phlox delays,
But forth of the gate and down the road,
Past the church and the yews, to their dim abode.
For it’s turn of the year and All Souls’ night,
When the dead can hear and the dead have sight.

II
Fear not that sound like wind in the trees:
It is only their call that comes on the breeze;
Fear not the shudder that seems to pass:
It is only the tread of their feet on the grass;
Fear not the drip of the bough as you stoop:
It is only the touch of their hands that grope–
For the year’s on the turn and it’s All Souls’ night,
When the dead can yearn and the dead can smite.

III
And where should a man bring his sweet to woo
But here, where such hundreds were lovers too?
Where lie the dead lips that thirst to kiss,
The empty hands that their fellows miss,
Where the maid and her lover, from sere to green,
Sleep bed by bed, with the worm between?
For it’s turn of the year and All Souls’ night,
When the dead can hear and the dead have sight.

IV
And now they rise and walk in the cold,
Let us warm their blood and give youth to the old.
Let them see us and hear us, and say: “Ah, thus
In the prime of the year it went with us!”
Till their lips drawn close, and so long unkist,
Forget they are mist that mingles with mist!
For the year’s on the turn, and it’s All Souls’ night,
When the dead can burn and the dead can smite.

V
Till they say, as they hear us–poor dead, poor dead!–
“Just an hour of this, and our age-long bed–
Just a thrill of the old remembered pains
To kindle a flame in our frozen veins,
A touch, and a sight, and a floating apart,
As the chill of dawn strikes each phantom heart–
For it’s turn of the year and All Souls’ night,
When the dead can hear and the dead have sight.”

VI
And where should the living feel alive
But here in this wan white humming hive,
As the moon wastes down, and the dawn turns cold,
And one by one they creep back to the fold?
And where should a man hold his mate and say:
“One more, one more, ere we go their way”?
For the year’s on the turn, and it’s All Souls’ night,
When the living can learn by the churchyard light.

VII
And how should we break faith who have seen
Those dead lips plight with the mist between,
And how forget, who have seen how soon
They lie thus chambered and cold to the moon?
How scorn, how hate, how strive, wee too,
Who must do so soon as those others do?
For it’s All Souls’ night, and break of the day,
And behold, with the light the dead are away. . .

 

Hallowe’en (1910)

John Kendrick Bangs

John Kendrick Bangs

John Kendrick Bangs

The ghosts of all things past parade, 
Emerging from the mist and shade 
That hid them from our gaze, 
And, full of song and ringing mirth, 
In one glad moment of rebirth, 
And again they walk the ways of earth 
As in the ancient days.

The beacon light shines on the hill, 
The will-o’-wisps the forests fill 
With flashes filched from noon;
And witches on their broomsticks spry 
Speed here and yonder in the sky, 
And lift their strident voices high
Unto the Hunter’s Moon.

The air resounds with tuneful notes 
From myriads of straining throats, 
All hailing Folly Queen; 
So join the swelling choral throng, 
Forget your sorrow and your wrong, 
In one glad hour of joyous song 
To honor Hallowe’en!

 

You might also like: 

The Wraith (Paranormalogistically)

“Can you help me?” I’ll never forget. (Big Séance)

Halloween Memories and Nostalgia from This Generation X-er (Big Séance)

Skin and Bones (Big Séance)

A New Spin On Your Halloween Altar and Decorations (Big Séance)

Planning a Halloween Party (in 1911) (Big Séance)

 

 

 


Halloween Memories and Nostalgia from This Generation X-er

From the moment there was a hint of fall in the air, I have been reminiscing and thinking about Halloweens growing up. Today I decided to type aloud just some of the memories and thoughts that come to mind. I bet those of you who grew up in the 70s and 80s have similar memories. Go ahead. Climb on into my Delorean and let’s travel back… back into time…

 

…to a time where Halloween meant witches with brooms, black cats, skeletons, and jack-o-lanterns with basic triangle eyes and jagged teeth. There was nothing more exciting than seeing your classroom teacher get out a big stash of black, white, and orange construction paper for craft time!

Remember scarecrows? You don’t see those guys much anymore. Maybe it was just a country thing. They were fun to make, but it was lots of itchy and scratchy work. I remember making a few with my parents and raiding my dad’s closet and drawers for just the right look.

This was the first set of Halloween cutout decorations that I remember. You can see the witch and the scarecrow centerpiece. Those were my favorites!

This was the first set of Halloween cutout decorations that we had that I remember. You can see the witch and the scarecrow centerpiece. Those were my favorites!

I remember getting so excited to go down to the basement for the box of decorations. Some 1970s cardboard cutouts for the windows were all it took. My favorite was the witch. She was so creepy. I also very much remember the honeycomb scarecrow centerpiece that we’d keep in the middle of the dinner table. I’m surprised it lasted as long as it did. Then there was the giant skeleton with movable parts. My sister remembers the black cat that had similar movable appendages. Lately I’ve made several Google searches for vintage Halloween nostalgia, and when you search for decorations, I recognize almost every generation of the more popular cutouts and can tell you where I remember them from. Some of them hung in teacher classrooms.  When I see a lot of popular Halloween decorations now, like the orange and purple strings of lights (that just scream Christmas to me) and the noisy and obnoxious blow up contraptions, I just don’t understand them. But this is probably just another one of those signs of getting older and less hip. I wish they would reproduce some of the more classic decorations like they used to. Many of the popular cutouts from the 1980s were apparently reprints from the 1960s. I will say that there is one trend in the last few years that I’ve been seeing in the stores that I definitely like. Everything is glittery and sparkly now! Yes, please! I would have LOVED a glittery orange pumpkin as a kid! Oh my gosh… memories of Elmer’s glue and glitter… don’t get me started…

Remember these?

Remember these?

Did you have classroom parties thrown by the room mothers? There was always punch, games (including the one where you have to sit on the balloon to pop it… I HATED that one), and treats tied up in those paper treat bags. By the time my younger sister went through school, they were afraid to call them “Halloween parties” and for a time they referred to them as “pumpkin parties”. Silly.

I can also remember the Christian versions of these treat bags that we were given at church. I’m not sure what Bible verse would be appropriate, but they always included one. People were encouraged to use those on Halloween, just in case anyone thought you were a devil worshiper because you were celebrating such a fun holiday. Even as a child and as a good boy, I can remember thinking “yeah, right!” and passing up the opportunity to take the Bible thumper bags. Of course, the Christian treat bags weren’t a big deal, considering a grandmother of mine, who was a strict Jehova’s Witness, lived a few houses down. She would preach about how horrible Halloween (or most holidays, for that matter) was, and I remember feeling pressured by her to not celebrate it. I loved her, but Halloween was one of those awkward times for that part of the family. 

Speaking of treats, I can almost guarantee that at some point in time, all of us were given a Tootsie Roll Pop with a white tissue wrapped over the top and tied with yarn, am I right? Mmmm… candy corn. When you went trick-or-treating, did you love or hate the popcorn ball? I didn’t get too excited about anything that was homemade, and sweet tarts and anything with marshmallow were always what I had left from my loot in February or March before I would decide to offer the rest to someone else.

A Halloween clown. I was a clown for a few years since the costume was so big. My Grandma, a master seamstress, did a great job at keeping me in costumes!

A Halloween clown. I was a clown for a few years since the costume was so big. My Grandma, a master seamstress, did a great job at keeping me in costumes!

Actually, trick-or-treating wasn’t something that I took part in for very long, and my sister actually hated it. For a few years, my parents would take me and my little sister (once she was in the picture) to the homes of family members and close friends. We’d show off our costumes, hop back in the car, and head off to the next destination before going back home to catch remaining trick-or-treaters at our own house. And actually, handing out the treats to the few visitors we did have was way more fun, in my opinion. When I was six we moved away from town and out into the country, so for me the traditional neighborhood trick-or-treating wasn’t a big thing. I remember always hearing my friends at school talk about it though, and we’d see ghosts and goblins lurking all over town when we were in the car driving from one place to the next. I’m not sure I would have ever walked up to a stranger’s house for candy. I’m sure this is due in part to the warnings of things like razors in apples and poison in candy. Those things never happened, of course, but I remember the warnings that were popular in those days.

I can't believe I found a photo of the same pattern I used to obsess over at my grandma's fabric shop!

I can’t believe I found a photo of the same pattern kit I used to obsess over at my grandma’s fabric shop!

And costumes were different in those days. Another grandmother of mine owned a fabric shop when I was young and I would “help” her clean and organize. I loved it! I remember being very interested in the McCall’s costume patterns, specifically the one pictured on the right! (I can’t believe I found a photo!) Do you remember how cool it was to pick out a make-up kit with just three basic colors? Just put some plastic vampire teeth in your mouth and it will make up for how cheap the make-up looked. No vampire teeth? That’s okay. Just stick some black wax on a few of your teeth and go as a “hobo”. Remember when dressing up as a hobo for Halloween was popular? Why did we do that? Weird. Speaking of weird, there are certain smells–like duct tape, for example–that instantly transport me back to the smell of a Halloween mask. I’ve heard others agree with me on this one, so I can’t be THAT weird.   

I’m not sure when it started or even if it was meant to be a tradition, but we usually had either chili or potato soup for dinner on Halloween. There was a year where my father somehow ended up with orange potato soup because of something weird that happened with the carrots that he added to the mix. I remember convincing my parents to let me add food coloring to the soup years later to truly make it orange. We’d listen to Monster Mash or even my favorite spooky sound effects “tape” (still have it) while setting the table for dinner. Now as an adult, I usually try to carry out the Halloween chili tradition. 

Now we live in a large suburban neighborhood, and I can’t even get home from work before they’re knocking on the door in daylight, so I make my chili the night before. We sit out front with a few decorations, candles, tiki torches, a big bowl of treats, and plenty of hot apple cider for anyone who wants it. 

I love this photo. My sister was Casper and this was her first (and probably last) Halloween trick-or-treat experience. As my mom explained on the back of this photo, "Patrick is a Mexican." Don't ask...

I love this photo. My sister was Casper and this was her first (and probably last) Halloween trick-or-treat experience. As my mom explained on the back of this photo, “Patrick is a Mexican.” Don’t ask…

 

I’m sure as soon as I publish this I’m going to think of about 50 things I forgot to include, but then again only four of you probably made it this far into my reminiscing… and thank you for that! 

Please feel free to comment and share your nostalgia or Halloween memories and traditions!

 

You might also like:

HALLOWEEN: An American Holiday, an American Tradition (Big Séance)

Skin and Bones (Big Séance)

A New Spin On Your Halloween Altar and Decorations (Big Séance)

Planning a Halloween Party (in 1911) (Big Séance)

 


10 important reasons to go see Chip Coffey at a “Coffey Talk” near you!

Me with Chip Coffey

Me with Chip Coffey

This week, thanks to a great friend and fellow investigator, I had the amazing opportunity to see psychic Chip Coffey at his St. Louis Coffey Talk appearance. Check out our photo! Aren’t we cute?! JUST LOOK AT US! Chip was a little under the weather that night, so at this very moment in the photo I was in the process of telling him the following: “Gosh I can’t imagine how great you are when you’re not sick… (awkward pause… signature cheesy smile) …because you totally rocked it!” I totally meant it… but wish I’d found a better way to say it. I hope he didn’t roll his eyes when I walked off! Seriously though, he was an absolute gentleman and shook my hand, asking my name before it was time to go. 

 

Chip doesn’t know me from Adam (don’t think I’ve ever said that), and this post is in no way affiliated with him, but allow me to share with you…

10 Important Reasons to Go See Chip Coffey

  1. He was the host of the amazing and groundbreaking series, Psychic Kids: Children of the Paranormal. Unfortunately, this show is no longer being produced, but I believe you can still catch it on A&E occasionally. There’s also a DVD available, and you can download episodes on iTunes as well. 
  2. He was featured in thirty-one episodes of Paranormal State, also on A&E. Other appearances include Larry King Live, Haunted Collector, Good Morning America, Nightline, CBS’s Sunday Morning, Entertainment Tonight, and others. 
  3. In 2012 he wrote a book called Growing Up Psychic, and it’s totally going to arrive on my doorstep this weekend. 
  4. Chip is passionate about saving and rescuing animals!  
  5. Chip does events and personal appearances! Find a scheduled event near you!
  6. Chip and I share a favorite word, apparently. It rhymes with “schmuck” and often has a nickname of “eff”. The use of this beautiful and colorful word, along with other important vocabulary, really aids in being able to fully grasp one’s message and meaning. I loved and appreciated it. The rest of the audience–composed of all ages, types, shapes, and colors–really appreciated it too. 
  7. You get to see which fabulous scarf Chip is wearing on that day! 
  8. You get a cool badge and lanyard (if you go VIP)! Who doesn’t get excited about that?!
  9. Chip was absolutely hilarious! Sitting among strangers, he had me belly laughing, crying, nearly peeing my pants, and looking at my neighbor with those “Did he really just… NO HE DIDN’T” eyes. You know what I’m talking about. 
  10. And finally, Chip really connected with the folks that were there. I really did feel like I was in a room with such great energy and surrounded by spirit. As Chip answered questions and did his gallery reading, there were clearly validations happening left and right. Just as you would suspect, some of these moments were incredibly emotional. I’d planned on asking about the two souls whose graves I adopted this fall and did a bit of research and genealogy on. I was curious to know if they were aware of my visits, and I really wanted to know how they died so young, since I was not able to locate that information. Earlier that day I also prayed and spoke to my guides, letting them know that any of my passed loved ones were welcome to make an appearance. I didn’t get chosen for a reading, but honestly, after hearing many of the powerful stories and seeing the tears of relief on many of the audience members’ faces, I felt silly for having the questions I was going to bring up. Chip worked his gift for a couple of hours, so there were many people who had the opportunity to get a message or validation, and it was great to be present for those moments.  

 

For more on Chip Coffey, visit www.ChipCoffey.com.

 


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